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Rachel Maddow Tag

Uh-oh: looks like I've had something of a mind-meld with Rachel Maddow . . . During Bill Clinton's DNC speech tonight, I tweeted "the spectacle of Bill Clinton telling the romantic story of how he met, wooed and married Hillary is deeply creepy." When the speech ended, Rachel Maddow, on MSNBC, called the top of the speech "shocking and weird," describing the beginning of the speech as "controversial." Maddow was miffed that Clinton spoke of "a girl," "the girl" and built "her whole political story for the whole first half of the speech around her marriage to him."

Where does Rachel Maddow's feminist solidarity end? When a woman has the audacity to support a Republican . . . On MSNBC, commenting on tonight's RNC, Maddow twice mocked speaker Natalie Gulbis, a professional golfer, for her current modest world ranking of about 500. In doing so, Maddow ignored the fact that Gulbis is a former #6 on the LPGA money list, has won four professional tournaments and at one point placed in the top 10 in four consecutive major championships. If Tiger Woods spoke for Trump, I suppose Maddow would dismiss him as "the 628th golfer in the world" [his current ranking.]

We have addressed Koch Derangement Syndrome before.  One of the most obsessive purveyors was Think Progress. Now Rachel Maddow has caught the bug, and it's eating away at her reputation as the intellectual giant, ahem, of MSNBC. She's come undone. The short version is that Maddow went all in claiming the Koch brothers were behind a Florida law requiring drug testing for welfare recipients.  Except that it wasn't true, and her explanation was lacking in logic or credibility. The logic is so convoluted it's hard to summarize.  Basically it involved participation by the Florida Foundation for Government Accountability (“FFGA”) in the State Policy Network (SPN), to which the Kochs contributed about $40,000 over several years.   FFGA defended the drug testing law.  Maddow blamed the Kochs. (Video here) This was the worst form of guilt by association -- that some group involved in an issue was a participant in a larger group to which the Kochs contributed.
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