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Roger Cohen Tag

Previously we noted that the New York Times has a tendency to play up the successes of the BDS movement and to play down the true nature of the BDS movement. The New York Times has since carried two more articles about BDS; one in the news section and one op-ed. Surprisingly, the opinion article took a critical look at BDS. Unfortunately the news story was consistent with previous New York Times coverage of the issue. In the news section, Jerusalem bureau chief, Jodi Rudoren wrote West Bank Boycott: A Political Act or Prejudice? For the most part Rudoren treats the issue "evenhandedly," giving each side equal time and not judging either side. In the course of the reporting Rudoren interviews BDS activist Omar Barghouti.
“He can say anything he wishes, but immoral? Resistance to his immoral policies can never be immoral,” Mr. Barghouti said of Mr. Netanyahu. “The litmus test is are you boycotting a group of people based on their identity, or are you boycotting something — an act, a company, a business — that you disagree with. “We have three reasons,” Mr. Barghouti said, citing the movement’s goals of ending the occupation; ensuring equality for Palestinian citizens of Israel; and promoting the right of return for Palestinian refugees. “End the three reasons and we won’t boycott.”
Barghouti, who got a degree from Tel Aviv University is a pretty good example of equality of Israel's minorities. That degree also makes Barghouti a hypocrites as his boycott would affect Tel Aviv University too. Rudoren ignores these inconsistencies. She also remains silent about Barghouti's demand for the right of return. Everyone knows that the point of that "right" is the destruction of Israel. In fact, Barghouti's claim confirms that the  the goal of the BDS movement is an assault on Israel's right to exist is correct. Rudoren doesn't appear to grasp this. Oddly, it is columnist Roger Cohen who got things right about BDS. In The B.D.S. Threat, Cohen writes:

It's time for the person most consistently wrong about the Muslim Brotherhood to admit that just about everything he said about the Muslim Brotherhood and Egypt's Arab Spring was wrong, including: Already we hear the predictable warnings from Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu: This could be Iran...

Roger Cohen of The NY Times famously told us in February 2011 (emphasis mine): Already we hear the predictable warnings from Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu: This could be Iran 1979, a revolution for freedom that installs the Islamists. But this is not 1979, and Egypt’s...

In February 2011, Roger Cohen of The NY Times demanded that we abandon the phrase "the Arab Street" as a relic of the past which no longer applied, even as crowds in Tunisia surged around a Synagogue shouting ""Jews, remember Khyabar, the army of Mohammed is returning"": Cohen further asserted...

I'm going to do this the way I did the U.S. presidential election.  Going with my gut. I'm "betting" on (but not rooting for) the Islamists. Unlike the presidential election, I will be right. 'Deadly' clashes at Egypt presidential palace: Supporters of Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi attacked opposition protesters...

Roger Cohen was among the worst of the delusional dreamers about the nature of the Islamist uprising in Egypt. I frequently have quoted this prediction by Cohen on February 3, 2011: Already we hear the predictable warnings from Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu: This could be Iran...

The Muslim Brotherhood President of Egypt already had brought the military to heel. Now he is discarding the judiciary: With a constitutional assembly on the brink of collapse and protesters battling the police in the streets here over the slow pace of change, President Mohamed Morsi issued a sweeping...

Joel Brinkley, currently a Professor at Stanford who spent most of his career as a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, has a column in the San Francisco Chronicle titled Islamists in Egypt, Libya, Tunisia not democratic. The thesis of the column is that Westerners who took...

I previously have highlighted the treatment of the "Arab Street" by NY Times columnist Roger Cohen in the midst of the Arab Spring protests, many of which revealed an open and ugly anti-Semitic side: In the Middle East you expect the worst. But having watched Egypt’s extraordinary civic...

Roger Cohen of The NY Times and other journalists were smitten with the Egyptian revolution, and denounced warnings of what lurked below the surface: (February 3, 2011)  Already we hear the predictable warnings from Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu: This could be Iran 1979, a revolution for...

In what will come as a shock to no one who lives in reality, the revolutions throughout the Middle East, while sparked in many instances by people who share western-style democratic values, are turning Islamist, and the Obama administration is dithering and accepting the outcome as a...

When it came to overthrowing Hosni Mubarek, the western media thrust itself into the situation and portrayed the uprising as a western-style demand for freedom.The television screens were filled with stories of relatively western figures such as Google employee Wael Ghonim, who became the face...

In the wake of the overthrow of Hosni Mubarek, we have heard much praise for the "Arab Street," including by Roger Cohen writing in The New York Times two days ago:In the Middle East you expect the worst. But having watched Egypt’s extraordinary civic achievement in...