Most Read
Image 01 Image 02 Image 03

Freedom of Religion Tag

Late last night, after I had gone to sleep, two things happened to ensure that I would not be able to take this morning off. First, Sidney Powell released her "Kraken" (more on that later), and second, the United States Supreme Court in a 5-4 decision handed down a huge religious liberty win against Andrew "Killer" Cuomo's lockdown restrictions on religious groups.

Over the last few months, Americans have watched in disgust as Democrat leaders banned people from attending church or opening their businesses, while allowing massive protests and riots. Now the funeral for Congressman John Lewis has shown, beyond any doubt, that there are two sets of rules, one for the liberal, political elite class, and another for everyone else.

Last night, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts joined the four liberal justices to deny injunctive relief to a church in Nevada which claimed that lockdown rules discriminated against religious groups, allowing much more lenient reopening for secular businesses such as casinos. This case was similar to the case from California, which we wrote about in late May, SCOTUS: Roberts Joins Liberals To Reject Injunction in California Religious Discrimination Lockdown:

The U.S. Supreme Court issued two important religious liberty decisions today. Both were 7-2 decisions with Sotomayor and Ginsburg in dissent. The first and most high profile was Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania, involving regulations allowing entities with religious or morality objections to the Obamacare contraceptive mandate. The lower courts ruled the regulations unlawful, but the Supreme Court reversed.

There are at least two cases in which we may get rulings soon from the U.S. Supreme Court on issues of religious liberty in the age of lockdown. Both cases allege that religious groups are being treated more harshly than secular businesses and groups. This type of disparate treatment has been at issue in many lower court cases, but now cases from California and Illinois have emergency motions for injunctive relief submitted to the Supreme Court, with responses due May 28.
Font Resize
Contrast Mode