The Cornell Review, the conservative newspaper on campus, has a long history of serving up great interns for Legal Insurrection.

You may remember Kathleen McCaffrey who was the first Legal Insurrection writer (other than me) and to whom we bid farewell in May 2012 after 1.5 years and over 300 posts (and who recently got married, congratulations!); Michael Alan (who wrote from time to time, and also took the video of the Syracuse Honor Flight return), and of course, Laurel Conrad our current intern, and President of the Cornell Review.

So it is with much pleasure that we note The Cornell Review has received the Buckley Award from the Collegiate Network, part of the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, which supports conservative students on campuses around the country.

(L-R: Collegiate Network program officer Lillian Gerken; Cornell Review President Laurel Conrad and Editor-in-Chief Michael Navarro; Intercollegiate Studies Institute Pres. Chris Long)

(L-R: Collegiate Network program officer Lillian Gerken; Cornell Review President Laurel Conrad and Editor-in-Chief Michael Navarro; Intercollegiate Studies Institute Pres. Chris Long)

Here’s the statement read at the award ceremony:

“Our next award is the coveted William F. Buckley Award for Outstanding Campus Reporting. The winning paper has reported on campus affairs thoroughly and conscientiously, and they have even influenced campus dialogue a time or two. In February, the winning paper received widespread media attention when they launched and reported on the impact of an online petition to stop the university’s plans to create a diversity requirement. The requirement indicated that each student, regardless of major, would have to take diversity classes to increase their appreciation for “social justice”. Their reporting drew a national media spotlight.

This paper also hosted and moderated the Student Assembly Presidential Debate. At the debate, this paper’s editors in chiefs and president were able to ask the candidates tough questions, thus establishing and guiding the dialogue of the debate. Numerous leaders and students on campus attended the event, which gained this paper a larger amount of name recognition and stature.”

When I see the hard work these students put in, and the courage they show to stand up as conservatives on campus, it gives me hope.

(Here’s why we say “Oorah“)