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Maryland Becomes Latest State to Ban New Gas-Powered Car Sales After 2035

Maryland Becomes Latest State to Ban New Gas-Powered Car Sales After 2035

Maryland becomes the 5th state to follow California off the green-energy cliff.

Maryland Gov. Wes Moore (D) has just announced that the state will adopt the clean-car rules that originated in California, phasing out the sales of new gasoline-powered cars by 2035.

The Advanced Clean Cars II rule, first implemented in California in 2022 under a provision of the Clean Air Act, allows states to impose stricter car standards than their federal counterparts. The standards are not retroactive to existing cars or to used car sales.

“Today, we’re talking about a major transformation that is going to define this administration—and that’s how we turn Maryland from a state powered by oil and gas to a state powered by clean energy,” Moore said in a statement. “I am confident that the state of Maryland can and will lead the clean energy revolution.”

Projections by the state Department of the Environment estimates that under the rule, Maryland will see 383,000 fewer sales of new gas-powered vehicles by the end of the decade. The state could also see lower carbon dioxide emissions from both the vehicles themselves and the power plants used to manufacture them by over 82 million metric tons.

Maryland becomes the 5th state to follow California off the green-energy cliff, and its governor relies on pseudoscience to promote this plan.

Maryland joins California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Washington in making the move.

In a statement, Moore said that, by 2040, the step could “potentially provide net in-state health benefits equal to about $39.9 million per year due to decreases in respiratory and cardiovascular illness and associated lost work days.”

The bans prevent automakers from selling new gasoline-powered cars in the seven states. But they don’t require anyone to stop driving their current car or prevent them from selling it used.

Maryland residents will still be able to buy and sell used gas-powered cars or buy new gas-powered cars in other states and title them in Maryland.

The state officials are not heeding the warning of a true expert in car technology: Toyota Motor chief Akio Toyoda.

“People involved in the auto industry are largely a silent majority,” Toyoda said. “That silent majority is wondering whether EVs are really OK to have as a single option. But they think it’s the trend so they can’t speak out loudly.”

“Because the right answer is still unclear, we shouldn’t limit ourselves to just one option,” he added.

The remarks come as supply chain issues that were sparked by the coronavirus pandemic have continued to make it difficult for manufacturers to get the raw materials needed to make new cars, especially electric vehicles.

All the reasons that Toyoda expresses are still valid. Lithium supplies remain a concern, even for proposed “solid state” batteries that may eventually work better than the lithium ion batteries now in use.

Although the internal constituents of batteries vary based on construction, lithium is a key factor in most. Globally, lithium prices have tripled in the past year alone, and that’s despite global lithium production tripling in just the past five years. There is, quite simply, a global shortage of the stuff.

The problem is that solid-state batteries could actually use even more lithium than today’s lithium-ion packs. Remember those higher-density anodes mentioned above? They’ll likely be made of pure lithium metal. “Now, lithium metal can increase the specific energy of your battery by up to three times but it comes as pure lithium, which means the lithium intensity is also increased,” [Rory McNulty, co-author of Benchmark Mineral Intelligence’s Solid-State and Lithium Metal Batteries Report] said, noting this will exacerbate the lithium shortage.

Charging time is not a trivial consideration. It takes 15 minutes, tops, to fill up a gas tank. However, EV charging can take considerably longer…especially if fast charging stations are full or unavailable.

Charging an EV can take anywhere from 15 minutes to 24 hours, depending on the type of charger you’re using and how low your battery level is. DC fast chargers will typically get your battery to about 80 percent in 30 to 60 minutes, while a Level 2 charger can take closer to 8 hours.

A friend of mine went to Santa Barbara in an EV recently. The normally 5-hour trip took 2 days: He could not locate a fast charging station and needed to charge his car overnight before getting to his destination.

Eventually, the battery will need to be replaced…at nearly the cost of a new car.

We reached out to five mechanics and technicians from different parts of the U.S. to see how much an EV battery replacement costs for different vehicles, and the average results ranged from $4,489 all the way to a staggering $17,658.

Keep reading to find out what an EV battery is, how long it lasts, how to know if yours is going bad, what it might cost you to repair or replace yours and whether a warranty can help.

All of these realities will not disappear because gasoline-powered cars are banned.

We are now experiencing an enhanced awareness of the consequences of blindly following narrative science offered by politically-connected “experts” as the Twitter Files and continuing investigation into the pandemic response show how real science was hidden from public view.

It’s time to investigate if fossil fuels really present significant “climate change” hazards or if carbon dioxide should be really viewed as a trace gas that is essential to plant life. A look at the messaging and the political connections is warranted before other states follow California into green madness.

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Comments


 
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RepublicanRJL | March 17, 2023 at 7:28 am

100% symbolic to please the Green Enery I Wanna Be GretaThunberg Society.

Might as well make the ending of the ban in 3035. I’m sure this idiocy has its supporters but China is cancelling out all US efforts with building of cheap and plentiful coal powered plants.

I’m glad I read where Massachusetts is one of those states banning car sales like California. Now, I know I’ll not be moving there.

How dare you, how DARE you!!!


     
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    CommoChief in reply to RepublicanRJL. | March 17, 2023 at 10:00 am

    This ban on internal combustion engine vehicles is another in the series of ideological eviction notices served out by the totalitarian leftists. The intolerant progressive left has telegraphed it’s intentions. If y’all live in these States but refuse to listen to message they are broadcasting in the clear what comes next is on you.


     
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    henrybowman in reply to RepublicanRJL. | March 17, 2023 at 1:53 pm

    What’s most amazing about this post is finding a Republican that would even consider MA as a new home. My cohort were all about escaping the Cod Curtain 25 years ago.


 
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Dimsdale | March 17, 2023 at 7:37 am

And who own/controls most of the lithium in the world? China.
Who builds most of the batteries? China.

How about not forcing the technology (all of it) down our throats until it is mature and functional, realized as a viable replacement for the ICE engine? Recent online reports of the battery life of the Ford Lightning pickup have been disappointing at best, with huge temperature effects and precipitous drops in capacity when pulling/carrying loads.

We don’t have the infrastructure to support a complete changeover to EVs. Period. See Californica.

Power generation stations are more polluting than the individual ICE cars combined.

Cheap to fuel, albeit slowly? Sure, but when the infrastructure has to be upgraded, the price will go up. And the government controls it more than they could gasoline.

What about all those gas taxes the cities, states and feds heap on fuel? That will have to be replaced (in the pols “minds”). You can bet that new “road use” taxes will be heaped on top of the taxes already burdening the price of fuel.

If EVs work for you, fine, grab one. But don’t mandate them.


     
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    UnCivilServant in reply to Dimsdale. | March 17, 2023 at 8:07 am

    The goal never was to change you to EVs, it was to force you out of your cars entirely. You are to be relegated to your pods in your fifteen minute cities where your self-appointed betters can control you.


     
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    MattMusson in reply to Dimsdale. | March 17, 2023 at 8:25 am

    Latest estimates are that 70% of Chinese Lithium batteries are made in Uighur Muslim Concentration Camps.

    Slave labor to go along with the Cobalt dug by child slaves in Africa.


     
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    randian in reply to Dimsdale. | March 18, 2023 at 5:14 am

    Power generation stations are more polluting than the individual ICE cars combined.

    Of course they are, that’s because modern emissions controls mean gasoline engines produce essentially zero emissions when warm and almost zero at cold start. When they say auto emissions are a health problem they’re lying.

    This low level of emissions was a problem for CARB and EPA because their detection equipment wasn’t sensitive enough. Naturally, rather than declare the war won, they reduced their emissions targets for new cars even further and spent lots of money on new detection equipment. Now they crow about “reducing emissions by 1/4”, but going from almost zero to almost zero is still almost zero, and accomplished nothing but force manufacturers to waste huge sums of money.


 
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Fredlike | March 17, 2023 at 7:40 am

I believe Virginia also passed a “let’s be as stupid as California” emissions law. The current legislature failed to repeal it this year. I see car dealerships set up like the smoke shops in VA. Cities have more tax than counties so at all the county/city lines there are smoke shops. In the future at all the state lines we will have car dealerships.


 
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nordic prince | March 17, 2023 at 7:42 am

Because you serfs won’t need any cars – gas, electric, or otherwise – in your 15-minute “smart cities” digital prisons.

Silly peasants.

The future bodes well for the used car market in Maryland. People will buy a new car in another more sane state and sell it in Maryland at a premium. Hooray for capitalism.


 
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MattMusson | March 17, 2023 at 8:26 am

Do you know why Oil Companies are always touting Solar and Wind Energy?

Because those intermittent sources will always require fossil fuel backup plants.


     
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    The Gentle Grizzly in reply to MattMusson. | March 17, 2023 at 9:32 am

    They also have them because they are not OIL companies; they are ENERGY companies.

    I fully expect to see charging stations with names like Shell, Chevron, Valero, BP, etc.

    Why? Because I fully expect there will be a transition to electric vehicles when the technology is mature, and the infrastructure is built out. That include nuclear power plants, which, magically, will be approved along with this transition.


 
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Ironclaw | March 17, 2023 at 8:37 am

So all they’re really doing is cutting themselves out of future taxes from new car sales.


 
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rhhardin | March 17, 2023 at 8:57 am

It’s worse than that. In 2039 windows XP stops working owing to 32-bit time roll over.


 
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rhhardin | March 17, 2023 at 9:02 am

Maryland state song first verse

The despot’s heel is on thy shore,
His torch is at thy temple door!
Avenge the patriotic gore
That flecked the streets of Baltimore,
And be the battle queen of yore,
Maryland! My Maryland!


 
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Eric R. | March 17, 2023 at 9:45 am

Israel, I might point out, has a ban on new GASOLINE powered vehicles after 2030.

Notice, they don’t ban NATURAL GAS powered vehicles, since Israel has plenty of that.

Unlike these six Communist states, at least Israel is trying to be green without being suicidally stupid.


     
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    Eagle1 in reply to Eric R.. | March 17, 2023 at 7:31 pm

    95% of the population of Israel (including the Gaza and West Bank, live in an area that is 130 miles long by 50 miles wide. If you are almost never going to be driving more than 100 miles you can operate quite efficiently on natural gas power or even electric.


       
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      murkyv in reply to Eagle1. | March 19, 2023 at 6:26 am

      Good point

      A local county tried nat gas/gasoline in all new county vehicles. The surveyors office got a new F550 utility bed truck that couldn’t make a trip from one side of the county to the other side and back before having to switch over to regular unleaded.

      With only one natural gas fillup point in the entire county


 
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guyjones | March 17, 2023 at 10:13 am

EV’s are toys for wealthy Dumb-o-crat elites. These idiotic and obnoxious “green” diktats are more economic yokes and albatrosses, hung about the necks of the middle class.


     
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    guyjones in reply to guyjones. | March 17, 2023 at 10:18 am

    I was talking to my Lyft driver the other day, and, we both agreed that EV’s are a decidedly lousy economic proposition for a working-class person, whether one drives for a living, or, commutes to work, or, whatever. EV’s cost more money up-front; require expensive battery replacement within a relatively short timespan after purchase; require more frequent tire replacement (because EV’s are heavier than gas-powered cars); require absurdly long waiting times to re-fuel; involve never-ending anxiety about range; boast poor performance in cold weather areas; etc., etc.


       
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      henrybowman in reply to guyjones. | March 17, 2023 at 2:07 pm

      A interesting argument against EV conservation I saw raised on a car website is that for weight reasons alone, IC cars get more efficient as you consume gas out of the tank, while EVs get less efficient as their batteries deplete.


       
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      nordic prince in reply to guyjones. | March 17, 2023 at 6:28 pm

      When I drove a taxi people would ask me my opinion about electric cars. EVs are simply too inconvenient with the down time needed to charge the things, and for a driver time is money. An ICE car is much quicker to refuel, has a much greater and more stable range, and is cheaper to buy. I’m thinking the operating costs are going to be cheaper as well.

      Simply not practical.


 
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murkyv | March 17, 2023 at 10:18 am

Destroying the earth to “save the planet”

Stupid is unbounded.

Maryland might save a lot of workdays for health reasons, but lose them in the winter when the EVs won’t charge enough to go anywhere.l


 
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George S | March 17, 2023 at 11:25 am

If the government wanted to immobilize you they would have to send out at least a quarter of a million agents to cover all the gas stations in the U.S with two agents to close them down.

Or, they can simply flip a switch at each of the three electrical power grids.

Something tells me it’s not science and economics…


 
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healthguyfsu | March 17, 2023 at 11:57 am

This is really dumb for Maryland. They are a small state and residents can easily go to bordering states for car purchases.

All they are losing is in-state commerce and revenue.


     
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    healthguyfsu in reply to healthguyfsu. | March 17, 2023 at 11:58 am

    If I’ve got some capital, I am setting up car dealerships in border towns of those neighbor states.


     
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    George S in reply to healthguyfsu. | March 17, 2023 at 12:55 pm

    Banning the sale is followed by the state refusing to register gasoline cars. You would have to establish residency in another state. After that, how easy would it be to find a gas station and how much would the gas cost? (Less gas sold, higher the price in order to stay in business).

    If you want a gas car you would have to join the police department or a government security detail. Guaranteed they’re not going to be hassling with EV’s.


       
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      healthguyfsu in reply to George S. | March 17, 2023 at 3:25 pm

      Most people have relatives in another state. Just register there. They usually don’t even require you to take up residence, you just have to have an address and tell the government that the car will be kept there (and they aren’t going to check).

      I know that this is easier for military (because they are legally allowed to do it) but I’ve seen it done for others too.


       
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      healthguyfsu in reply to George S. | March 17, 2023 at 3:26 pm

      PDs have hassled with EVs in the past in some areas and had some disastrous results during pursuits.


     
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    henrybowman in reply to healthguyfsu. | March 17, 2023 at 2:10 pm

    I had that thought as well.
    You know what “oppressed class” would be hit hardest due to geography?
    Three guesses.


 
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bobinreverse | March 17, 2023 at 1:48 pm

Good. Baltimore will become Havana- tourists can come to see antique cars on the streets. And spec good if O’s split for Nashville.

The sheer lunacy boggles the mind. Of course the first thing I thought of when reading was the hilarious sequence of events last summer:

1) California legislature passes bill ‘banning’ ICE vehicles after 2030
2) Literally the same week the California electric grid regulatory agency releases a public service announcement begging people not to charge their electric vehicles because the grid cannot handle it
3) The leftist loons in California continue to block any and all improvements to power generation or distribution capacity (and water infrastructure, but I digress)

So after reading about this virtue-signaling in Maryland a quick Google search reveals:

https://www.cbsnews.com/baltimore/news/maryland-one-of-13-states-warned-of-rolling-blackouts-asked-to-conserve


 
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henrybowman | March 17, 2023 at 1:51 pm

“Maryland joins California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, and Washington in making the move.”
Wow, we may get our de facto secession without lifting a finger.
I’m sure DC would be in there, too… that is, if they had any car dealers, which (like gun dealers) they already don’t.


     
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    CommoChief in reply to henrybowman. | March 17, 2023 at 2:53 pm

    The great sorting is ongoing. Some people choose to read the signs and relocate to an area that better reflects their ideology. Frankly it is becoming less about political affiliation and far more about the level of individual liberty and the commitment of the State/Community to that basic idea.


       
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      healthguyfsu in reply to CommoChief. | March 17, 2023 at 3:28 pm

      I disagree. People are moving based on economic sorting. We have to stop the exploit of our great states flooded with progressives that can buy your house 2x due to inflated salaries and cost of living in their liberal shithole.


         
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        CommoChief in reply to healthguyfsu. | March 18, 2023 at 8:17 am

        Economics is a part of it. The draconian tax and regulatory regimes in some States are driving folks out. As are issues of basic services; Police, fire, garbage collection.

        Quality of life issues play a role here as well; chronically underperforming public schools, woke weirdos in positions to make life harder, homeless drug addled population unaddressed, rampant crime and in some places rat infestation.

        How do you propose to stop folks moving out of a ‘liberal shithole’ and opting instead to relocate to a State that doesn’t have the same level of problems they are fleeing? Some are proposing a one time ‘entry fee’ but that seems tenuous to me. Better, IMO, to require developers to pay 100% of the cost for new the infrastructure required for new housing development; all the roads, utility lines and so forth.

        Obviously increased demand for housing will inflate the existing price but I don’t see how, much less why, we would want to stop folks from making a purchase with their own money.


 
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diver64 | March 17, 2023 at 3:55 pm

Leave those States. Now. They are sowing the seeds of their own destruction.


 
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Subotai Bahadur | March 17, 2023 at 5:45 pm

1) As has been noted, this will destroy car dealerships in Maryland. Higher unemployment and lower tax revenue, however much they raise the tax rates.
2) I do wonder what effect this law will have on IC-engined trucks, both gasoline and diesel powered.
3) If trucks are affected, it is going to be awful hard to find goods and food in stores in Maryland.
4) It is interesting that the TWANLOC states are self-separating. This is going to get amusing. I figure that they are going to assume that we will automatically rescue them from their own actions. I have absolutely no desire to do so.

Subotai Bahadur


 
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Eagle1 | March 17, 2023 at 7:39 pm

Well, at least this was done by executive fiat which makes it somewhat more reversible than in Virginia. As a Maryland resident, this will require doubling or tripling the transmission capacity of the grid, as well as a double or tripling of generation capacity. Where are those plants going to be built? Probably not in downtown Annapolis, Baltimore, or the rest of the DC suburbs; if you can get by the state environmental hoops to even build them at all.

They want this electricity, build the plants where you live.


 
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Stuytown | March 18, 2023 at 6:38 am

More electric cars. More grid instability. Buy Generac (GNRC) on the NYSE. I have. Not a quick hit. Long term play on disastrous government energy policies. When the people with electric cars realize that they can’t even fuel their cars after a storm, they, too, will be buying generators.


     
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    CommoChief in reply to Stuytown. | March 18, 2023 at 8:35 am

    Better yet get a small solar system installed at your home to offset the increasing grid unreliability or even the potential of some bureaucracy deciding to turn off the power.

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