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9/11 at 20 – They Have Names

9/11 at 20 – They Have Names

9/11 after 20 years is not, for me, about the Towers burning and collapsing. It’s about the names.

http://video.nydailynews.com/FDNY-Squad-1-remembers-fallen-firefighters-on-911-25156999

Every year for the past decade I have written a 9/11 Anniversay post. This year has been harder than usual because of the stain of Biden’s Afghanistan withdrawal fiasco, a product of his desire to exploit this date. The result is Biden has allowed our enemies to rejoice over us as they did 20 years ago.

But I can’t let my disgust with the Biden administration cause me not to remember this day and the people who perished. I’ll recount some of the posts I’ve done, and some of the names.

My most vivid memory was the sound. I never have been able to erase that sound from my memory.

Each of those PASS  (Personal Alert Safety System) devices represented a fallen hero, and among them were over 2000 more office workers for whom no siren sounded, but they all had names.

One of those names was Melissa Harrington Hughes, who I wrote about in my first 9/11 Anniversary post in 2011, 9/11/01 and Memory:

Memory is a strange thing.

There are many things I remember about the attacks on 9/11/01:  The first announcement when I was at my desk in Providence that a “small plane” had hit the World Trade Center, the announcement of a second “small plane” and then the reality; the collapse of the buildings, something that was unimaginable; the films of people jumping from windows above the flames; and the images of medical staff at St. Vincent’s Hospital and elsewhere who waited for thousands of injured who never appeared because there were so few survivors.

But three things keep coming back to me.

***

Third, the farewell messages from people trapped above the flames or on Flight 93 left on answering machines of loved ones.

The one I remember most vividly was that of Melissa Harrington Hughes who was visiting New York on business.  Melissa did speak to her father, who recounts the events here, and then left this message for her husband who was asleep in San Francisco and didn’t answer the phone in time.  When he tried to call her back, the call didn’t go through.

Another of those names was IDF Veteran Danny Lewin, the first person killed on 9/11/2001;

[Memorial to Danny Lewin in the main lobby of Akamai Technologies in Cambridge, MA]

One of those names I just learned from The Falling Man, an Esquire article I just read for the first time:

They began jumping not long after the first plane hit the North Tower, not long after the fire started. They kept jumping until the tower fell. They jumped through windows already broken and then, later, through windows they broke themselves. They jumped to escape the smoke and the fire; they jumped when the ceilings fell and the floors collapsed; they jumped just to breathe once more before they died. They jumped continually, from all four sides of the building, and from all floors above and around the building’s fatal wound. They jumped from the offices of Marsh & McLennan, the insurance company; from the offices of Cantor Fitzgerald, the bond-trading company; from Windows on the World, the restaurant on the 106th and 107th floors—the top. For more than an hour and a half, they streamed from the building, one after another, consecutively rather than en masse, as if each individual required the sight of another individual jumping before mustering the courage to jump himself or herself. One photograph, taken at a distance, shows people jumping in perfect sequence, like parachutists, forming an arc composed of three plummeting people, evenly spaced. Indeed, there were reports that some tried parachuting, before the force generated by their fall ripped the drapes, the tablecloths, the desperately gathered fabric, from their hands. They were all, obviously, very much alive on their way down, and their way down lasted an approximate count of ten seconds. They were all, obviously, not just killed when they landed but destroyed, in body though not, one prays, in soul. One hit a fireman on the ground and killed him; the fireman’s body was anointed by Father Mychal Judge, whose own death, shortly thereafter, was embraced as an example of martyrdom after the photograph—the redemptive tableau—of firefighters carrying his body from the rubble made its way around the world.

The Falling Man was Jonathan Eric Briley:

Jonathan Eric Briley came into this world on March 5, 1958, to Marie and Alexander Briley, and he departed this world on September 11, 2001.

He received his elementary and secondary education through the Mount Vernon, New York, public school system, and he received his Bachelor of Arts degree from New York University, New York. His expertise took him into the profession of Sound Engineer for various corporations such as Arrowwood in Rye Brook, New York, The Hilton, The Marriott, and Windows On The World at the World Trade Center in New York City.

Jonathan accepted Christ at an early age. In his teenage years, he was a member of Shiloh Baptist Church, New Rochelle, New York. There, he served in the Christian Education Ministry and the Music Ministry. At the time of his death, he worshiped at First Baptist Church of Elmsford, New York, where he was ordained as a Deacon on March 11, 2001 and served as a armor bearer for his father and pastor, Rev. Alexander Briley Jr.

Jonathan, imbued with the spirit of humility, never failed to look for an opportunity to be of service. He used his skills as an Audio Engineer in churches up and down the east coast. The quiet, peaceful spirit that resided in his 6’5 ½” frame was a beacon of light and warmth that was felt by everyone who came in contact with him. His sense of humor attested to the joy of his spirit. His patience was a source of strength to everyone he met. Jonathan’s life blessed God because of the fruits of The Holy Spirit.

He fell in love with Hillary Mattox (Miss Thing), and on July 23, 1994, they were joined together in holy matrimony.

Jonathan (affectionately known as Slim by Tim and Mister by Hillary) is survived by his wife Hillary Briley; his parents, Rev. and Mrs. Alexander Briley Jr.; his brother, Alexander Briley III of Mount Vernon; his sister Gwendolyn Strand of Ft. Washington, Maryland; his sister, Joanne Briley; his brother, Timothy Briley, both of Mount Vernon; one brother-in-law, Edward Strand; one niece, Michelle Christian; one nephew, Edward Eric Strand; one great nephew, Jordan Alexander Christian; three aunts; one uncle; and a host of relatives and friends.

The Esquire article noted:

One hit a fireman on the ground and killed him; the fireman’s body was anointed by Father Mychal Judge, whose own death, shortly thereafter, was embraced as an example of martyrdom after the photograph—the redemptive tableau—of firefighters carrying his body from the rubble made its way around the world.

We covered the life and story of that fireman in 2017. His name was Danny Suhr.

https://legalinsurrection.com/2017/09/911-remembering-firefighter-danny-suhr-killed-by-a-falling-body/

Those firemen who survived must be haunted by the memories:

In 2015, we covered the firemen of FDNY Squad 1 Memorial, Park Slope, Brooklyn. They had names.

http://www.angelfire.com/nc3/squadco1/memorial.html

One of those names may be familiar to you. Squad 1 member Steven Siller is remembered by an annual Tunnels to Towers 5k run:

On September 11th, 2001, firefighter Stephen Siller had just gotten off the late shift at Squad 1, Park Slope, Brooklyn. He was on his way to play golf with his brothers on that bright clear day when his scanner told of the first plane hitting the Twin Towers. When he heard the news, he called his wife Sally to tell her he would be late because he had to help those in need.

He returned to Squad 1 to get his gear, then took his final heroic steps to the World Trade Center. When Stephen drove his truck to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, it was already closed to traffic . With sixty pounds of gear strapped to his back, he ran through the Tunnel, hoping to meet up with his own company. Stephen laid down his life on 9/11.

Ever since, the Siller Family has honored his legacy with the Tunnel to Towers Run. The event supports children who have lost a parent, firefighters and military who have been seriously injured and sacrificed their quality of life in the line of duty.

Steven Siller’s brother Frank now heads the Tunnel to Towers Foundation, which provides mortgage free and disability-modified homes to the families of fallen and injured heroes. You’ve probably seen the commercials on TV:

In 2018, we covered another fireman and his policeman brother, both of whom died on 9/11 and were from my hometown, Roslyn, NY. Their names were Thomas and Peter Langone.

https://legalinsurrection.com/2018/09/9-11-remembering-thomas-and-peter-langone-roslyn-ny/

Why have I focused so heavily on firemen? It wasn’t deliberate or planned. It’s just that among my memories is hearing the stories from survivors of the fireman climbing up the stairwells in the World Trade Towers loaded with heavy equipment as office workers were heading down the stairs to safety.

What kind of person knowingly walks into perilous danger to save others? Hundreds of firemen on 9/11, all of whom had names.

All 343 911wtc Killed at the World Trade Center September 11, 2001
This page was assembled by Don Van Holt Webmaster for NYFD.COM

Joseph
Agnello, Lad.118

Lt. Brian
Ahearn, Bat.13

Eric
Allen, Sqd.18 (D)

Richard
Allen, Lad.15

Cpt. James
Amato, Sqd.1

Calixto
Anaya Jr., Eng.4

Joseph
Angelini, Res.1 (D)

Joseph
Angelini Jr., Lad.4

Faustino
Apostol Jr., Bat.2

David
Arce, Eng.33

Louis
Arena, Lad.5 (D)

Carl
Asaro, Bat.9

Lt. Gregg
Atlas, Eng.10

Gerald
Atwood, Lad.21

Gerald
Baptiste, Lad.9

A.C. Gerard
Barbara, Cmd. Ctr.

Matthew
Barnes, Lad.25

Arthur
Barry, Lad.15

Lt.Steven
Bates, Eng.235

Carl
Bedigian, Eng.214

Stephen
Belson, Bat.7

John
Bergin, Res.5

Paul
Beyer, Eng.6

Peter
Bielfeld, Lad.42

Brian
Bilcher, Sqd.1

Carl
Bini, Res.5

Christopher
Blackwell, Res.3

Michael
Bocchino, Bat.48

Frank
Bonomo, Eng.230

Gary
Box, Sqd.1

Michael
Boyle, Eng.33

Kevin
Bracken, Eng.40

Michael
Brennan, Lad.4

Peter
Brennan, Res.4

Cpt. Daniel
Brethel, Lad.24 (D)

Cpt. Patrick
Brown, Lad.3

Andrew
Brunn, Lad.5 (D)

Cpt. Vincent
Brunton, Lad.105

F.M. Ronald
Bucca

Greg
Buck, Eng.201

Cpt. William
Burke Jr., Eng.21

A.C. Donald
Burns, Cmd. Ctr.

John
Burnside, Lad.20

Thomas
Butler, Sqd.1

Patrick
Byrne, Lad.101

George
Cain, Lad.7

Salvatore
Calabro, Lad.101

Cpt. Frank
Callahan, Lad.35

Michael
Cammarata, Lad.11

Brian
Cannizzaro, Lad.101

Dennis
Carey, Hmc.1

Michael
Carlo, Eng.230

Michael
Carroll, Lad.3

Peter
Carroll, Sqd.1 (D)

Thomas
Casoria, Eng.22

Michael
Cawley, Lad.136

Vernon
Cherry, Lad.118

Nicholas
Chiofalo, Eng.235

John
Chipura, Eng.219

Michael
Clarke, Lad.2

Steven
Coakley, Eng.217

Tarel
Coleman, Sqd.252

John
Collins, Lad.25

Robert
Cordice, Sqd.1

Ruben
Correa, Eng.74

James
Coyle, Lad.3

Robert
Crawford, Safety

Lt. John
Crisci, H.M.

B.C. Dennis
Cross, Bat.57 (D)

Thomas
Cullen III, Sqd. 41

Robert
Curatolo, Lad.16 (D)

Lt. Edward
D’Atri, Sqd.1

Michael
D’Auria, Eng.40

Scott
Davidson, Lad.118

Edward
Day, Lad.11

B.C. Thomas
DeAngelis, Bat. 8

Manuel
Delvalle, Eng.5

Martin
DeMeo, H.M. 1

David
DeRubbio, Eng.226

Lt. Andrew
Desperito, Eng.1 (D)

B.C. Dennis
Devlin, Bat.9

Gerard
Dewan, Lad.3

George
DiPasquale, Lad.2

Lt. Kevin
Donnelly, Lad.3

Lt. Kevin
Dowdell, Res.4

B.C. Raymond
Downey, Soc.

Gerard
Duffy, Lad.21

Cpt. Martin
Egan, Jr., Div.15 (D)

Michael
Elferis, Eng.22

Francis
Esposito, Eng.235

Lt. Michael
Esposito, Sqd.1

Robert
Evans, Eng.33

B.C. John
Fanning, H.O.

Cpt. Thomas
Farino, Eng.26

Terrence
Farrell, Res.4

Cpt. Joseph
Farrelly, Div.1

Dep. Comm. William
Feehan, (D)

Lee
Fehling, Eng.235

Alan
Feinberg, Bat.9

Michael
Fiore, Res.5

Lt. John
Fischer, Lad.20

Andre
Fletcher, Res.5

John
Florio, Eng.214

Lt. Michael
Fodor, Lad.21

Thomas
Foley, Res.3

David
Fontana, Sqd.1

Robert
Foti, Lad.7

Andrew
Fredericks, Sqd.18

Lt. Peter
Freund, Eng.55

Thomas
Gambino Jr., Res.3

Chief of Dept. Peter
Ganci, Jr. (D)

Lt. Charles
Garbarini, Bat.9

Thomas
Gardner, Hmc.1

Matthew
Garvey, Sqd.1

Bruce
Gary, Eng.40

Gary
Geidel, Res.1

B.C. Edward
Geraghty, Bat.9

Dennis
Germain, Lad.2

Lt. Vincent
Giammona, Lad.5

James
Giberson, Lad.35

Ronnie
Gies, Sqd.288

Paul
Gill, Eng.54

Lt. John
Ginley, Eng.40

Jeffrey
Giordano, Lad.3

John
Giordano, Hmc.1

Keith
Glascoe, Lad.21

James
Gray, Lad.20

B.C. Joseph
Grzelak, Bat.48

Jose
Guadalupe, Eng.54

Lt. Geoffrey
Guja, Bat.43

Lt. Joseph
Gullickson, Lad.101

David
Halderman, Sqd.18

Lt. Vincent
Halloran, Lad.8

Robert
Hamilton, Sqd.41

Sean
Hanley, Lad.20 (D)

Thomas
Hannafin, Lad.5

Dana
Hannon, Eng.26

Daniel
Harlin, Lad.2

Lt. Harvey
Harrell, Res.5

Lt. Stephen
Harrell, Bat.7

Cpt. Thomas
Haskell, Jr., Div.15

Timothy
Haskell, Sqd.18 (D)

Cpt. Terence
Hatton, Res.1

Michael
Haub, Lad.4

Lt. Michael
Healey, Sqd.41

John
Hefferman, Lad.11

Ronnie
Henderson, Eng.279

Joseph
Henry, Lad.21

William
Henry, Res.1 (D)

Thomas
Hetzel, Lad.13

Cpt. Brian
Hickey, Res.4

Lt. Timothy
Higgins, S.O.C.

Jonathan
Hohmann, Hmc.1

Thomas
Holohan, Eng.6

Joseph
Hunter, Sqd.288

Cpt. Walter
Hynes, Lad.13 (D)

Jonathan
Ielpi, Sqd.288

Cpt. Frederick
Ill Jr., Lad.2

William
Johnston, Eng.6

Andrew
Jordan, Lad.132

Karl
Joseph, Eng.207

Lt. Anthony
Jovic, Bat.47

Angel
Juarbe Jr., Lad.12

Mychal
Judge, Chaplain (D)

Vincent
Kane, Eng.22

B.C. Charles
Kasper, S.O.C.

Paul
Keating, Lad.5

Richard
Kelly Jr., Lad.11

Thomas R.
Kelly, Lad.15

Thomas W.
Kelly, Lad.105

Thomas
Kennedy, Lad.101

Lt. Ronald
Kerwin, Sqd.288

Michael
Kiefer, Lad.132

Robert
King Jr., Eng.33

Scott
Kopytko, Lad.15

William
Krukowski, Lad.21

Kenneth
Kumpel, Lad.25

Thomas
Kuveikis, Sqd.252

David
LaForge, Lad.20

William
Lake, Res.2

Robert
Lane, Eng.55

Peter
Langone, Sqd.252

Scott
Larsen, Lad.15

Lt. Joseph
Leavey, Lad.15

Neil
Leavy, Eng.217

Daniel
Libretti, Res.2

Carlos
Lillo, Paramedic

Robert
Linnane, Lad.20

Michael
Lynch, Eng.40

Michael
Lynch, Lad.4

Michael
Lyons, Sqd.41

Patrick
Lyons, Sqd.252

Joseph
Maffeo, Lad.101

William
Mahoney, Res 4

Joseph
Maloney, Lad.3 (D)

B.C. Joseph
Marchbanks Jr, Bat.12

Lt. Charles
Margiotta, Bat.22

Kenneth
Marino, Res.1

John
Marshall, Eng.23

Lt. Peter
Martin, Res.2

Lt. Paul
Martini, Eng.23

Joseph
Mascali, T.S.U. 2

Keithroy
Maynard, Eng.33

Brian
McAleese, Eng.226

John
McAvoy, Lad.3

Thomas
McCann, Bat.8

Lt. William
McGinn, Sqd.18

B.C. William
McGovern, Bat.2 (D)

Dennis
McHugh, Lad.13

Robert
McMahon, Lad.20

Robert
McPadden, Eng.23

Terence
McShane, Lad.101

Timothy
McSweeney, Lad.3

Martin
McWilliams, Eng.22 (D)

Raymond
Meisenheimer, Res.3

Charles
Mendez, Lad.7

Steve
Mercado, Eng.40

Douglas
Miller, Res.5

Henry
Miller Jr, Lad.105

Robert
Minara, Lad.25

Thomas
Mingione, Lad.132

Lt. Paul
Mitchell, Bat.1

Capt. Louis
Modafferi, Res.5

Lt. Dennis
Mojica, Res.1 (D)

Manuel
Mojica, Sqd.18 (D)

Carl
Molinaro, Lad.2

Michael
Montesi, Res.1

Capt. Thomas
Moody, Div.1

B.C. John
Moran, Bat.49

Vincent
Morello, Lad.35

Christopher
Mozzillo, Eng.55

Richard
Muldowney Jr, Lad.07

Michael
Mullan, Lad.12

Dennis
Mulligan, Lad.2

Lt. Raymond
Murphy, Lad.16

Lt. Robert
Nagel, Eng.58

John
Napolitano, Res.2

Peter
Nelson, Res.4

Gerard
Nevins, Res.1

Dennis
O’Berg, Lad.105

Lt. Daniel
O’Callaghan, Lad.4

Douglas
Oelschlager, Lad.15

Joseph
Ogren, Lad.3

Lt. Thomas
O’Hagan, Bat.4

Samuel
Otice, Lad.4

Patrick
O’Keefe, Res.1

Capt. William
O’Keefe, Div.15 (D)

Eric
Olsen, Lad.15

Jeffery
Olsen, Eng.10

Steven
Olson, Lad.3

Kevin
O’Rourke, Res.2

Michael
Otten, Lad.35

Jeffery
Palazzo, Res.5

B.C. Orio
Palmer, Bat.7

Frank
Palombo, Lad.105

Paul
Pansini, Eng.10

B.C. John
Paolillo, Bat.11

James
Pappageorge, Eng.23

Robert
Parro, Eng.8

Durrell
Pearsall, Res.4

Lt. Glenn
Perry, Bat.12

Lt. Philip
Petti, Bat.7

Lt. Kevin
Pfeifer, Eng. 33

Lt. Kenneth
Phelan, Bat.32

Christopher
Pickford, Eng.201

Shawn
Powell, Eng.207

Vincent
Princiotta, Lad.7

Kevin
Prior, Sqd.252

B.C. Richard
Prunty, Bat.2 (D)

Lincoln
Quappe, Res.2

Lt. Michael
Quilty, Lad.11

Ricardo
Quinn, Paramedic

Leonard
Ragaglia, Eng.54

Michael
Ragusa, Eng.279

Edward
Rall, Res.2

Adam
Rand, Sqd.288

Donald
Regan, Res.3

Lt. Robert
Regan, Lad.118

Christian
Regenhard, Lad.131

Kevin
Reilly, Eng.207

Lt. Vernon
Richard, Lad.7

James
Riches, Eng.4

Joseph
Rivelli, Lad.25

Michael
Roberts, Eng.214

Michael E.
Roberts, Lad.35

Anthony
Rodriguez, Eng.279

Matthew
Rogan, Lad.11

Nicholas
Rossomando, Res.5

Paul
Ruback, Lad.25

Stephen
Russell, Eng.55

Lt. Michael
Russo, S.O.C.

B.C. Matthew
Ryan, Bat.1

Thomas
Sabella, Lad.13

Christopher
Santora, Eng.54

John
Santore, Lad.5 (D)

Gregory
Saucedo, Lad.5

Dennis
Scauso, H.M. 1

John
Schardt, Eng.201

B.C. Fred
Scheffold, Bat.12

Thomas
Schoales, Eng.4

Gerard
Schrang, Res.3 (D)

Gregory
Sikorsky, Sqd.41

Stephen
Siller, Sqd.1

Stanley
Smagala Jr, Eng.226

Kevin
Smith, H.M. 1

Leon
Smith Jr, Lad 118

Robert
Spear Jr, Eng.26

Joseph
Spor, Res.3

B.C. Lawrence
Stack, Bat.50

Cpt. Timothy
Stackpole, Div.11 (D)

Gregory
Stajk, Lad.13

Jeffery
Stark, Eng.230

Benjamin
Suarez, Lad.21

Daniel
Suhr, Eng.216 (D)

Lt. Christopher
Sullivan, Lad.111

Brian
Sweeney, Res.1

Sean
Tallon, Lad.10

Allan
Tarasiewicz, Res.5

Paul
Tegtmeier, Eng.4

John
Tierney, Lad.9

John
Tipping II, Lad.4

Hector
Tirado Jr, Eng.23

Richard
Van Hine, Sqd.41

Peter
Vega, Lad.118

Lawrence
Veling, Eng.235

John
Vigiano II, Lad.132

Sergio
Villanueva, Lad.132

Lawrence
Virgilio, Sqd.18 (D)

Lt. Robert
Wallace, Eng.205

Jeffery
Walz, Lad. 9

Lt. Michael
Warchola, Lad.5 (D)

Capt. Patrick
Waters, S.O.C.

Kenneth
Watson, Eng.214

Michael
Weinberg, Eng.1 (D)

David
Weiss, Res.1

Timothy
Welty, Sqd.288

Eugene
Whelan, Eng.230

Edward
White, Eng.230

Mark
Whitford, Eng.23

Lt. Glenn
Wilkinson, Eng.238 (D)

B.C. John
Williamson, Bat.6 (D)

Capt. David
Wooley, Lad.4

Raymond
York, Eng.285 (D)

So 9/11 after 20 years is not, for me, about the Towers burning and collapsing. It’s about the names, as Mandy poignantly wrote in 2013, in what would be her last 9/11 post, Remembering September 11th and the importance of loved ones and endurance:

The morning of September 11th, 2001, I was sitting in my office at a prior job, admiring the beautiful blue sky outside my window, when my phone rang.

“I can’t reach your brother anymore. His phone cut off. He was running and his phone just died,” my mother cried on the other end.

For a moment, I had no idea why she was upset or what she was talking about.  But then another line rang and a friend’s voice, equally upset, screamed to me, “They’re flying planes into buildings where your brother is.”

I sat stunned for a minute, paralyzed with fear and dread.  I opened my office door and there was an eerie feeling in the air.  It was noisy, yet quiet and somber at the same time….

My brother worked for a Wall Street brokerage firm at the time, just steps away from the World Trade Center.  By now, my mom had explained to me that she’d been on the phone with him while he’d been running from his building.  He’d called her, absolutely frantic, trying to tell her that planes had hit the Twin Towers and he was trying to escape the area.  He was describing an absolutely horrific scene of destruction and death as my mom cried on the other end.  And then the phone went dead….

I drove straight to my mother’s house, where the whole family gathered and waited to hear from my brother again, not knowing if he was safe.  Every few minutes, the phone would ring and it would be a family member or friend, checking to see if he had made it out and home safely….

It wasn’t until late in the afternoon that we’d finally heard back from him.  He’d borrowed the phone of a stranger and was able to get the call through to let us know he’d made it across the Brooklyn Bridge by foot and could hitch a ride to an exit on a nearby highway, where I had later picked him up myself.

We all spent the night together at my parents’ house, thankful to know that my brother was safe, but heartbroken about what our country was enduring.

My mother still has that stranger’s phone number written down and saved on a piece of paper.

September 11th taught me the importance of family and loved ones in our lives, as well as the compassion of those we may not know, and that we can never, ever take life for granted….

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Comments

Thank you for taking time again to share your remembrances. It captures a glimpse of what followed a beautiful day’s beginning.

Thank you

God Bless America

Great tribute, Professor. Thank you.

Thank you very much for the fitting tribute to those whom we need to remember this day.

A moving and fitting tribute, devoid of politics and partisanship and rightly focused on those we lost. #SayTheirNames

On 9/10/2001 we did not think we were at war.
On 9/10/2021…..

On 9/12/2001 the country was the most united it has ever been since WWII.
On 9/12/2021 the country is….

That is the pain of saying their names.

    Sisu in reply to Andy. | September 11, 2021 at 8:38 pm

    And, not one news channel could simply allow the reading of the names today. I was only able to witness and change channels until CSPAN announced milley was going to speak. … Clearly, if one does not have a personal connection it is merely recent history; and it’s only 20 years. …

Great post, Professor

And today, our piece of Sh!t President will not speak to honor the victims of 9-11

Think about that…

    Conservative Beaner in reply to gonzotx. | September 11, 2021 at 1:18 pm

    Good because he does not deserve to mention their names. They died with bravery and honor and Biden has neither of those qualities.

      Agreed. Biden is so corrupt and so wrong he has no place remembering these people. I remember this day as watching people jumping out of a skyscraper to their deaths in order to flee the flames behind them. I also remember the videos of those people hitting the ground.

      God damn Joseph Biden.

Great article. Please repost every year.

I was angry on 9/11/2001, and have been mad every day since then. Joseph R. Biden proclaims that Islam is a “religion of peace.” Maybe it is, for the 20% who did not cheer on 9/11/2001. For the other 80%, it is a “religion of war.”

Still mad, will die mad.

TY Professor,,, I hope you post this article every year..

They have names.. and the one I would like to share is Christine Lee Hanson. She was the youngest of all the 9/11 victims, she was on the first plane, flight 175. The Hanson family has a tie to my husband’s family.. three degrees of separation, it is very real.

Not to take away from private grief, but publicly it’s soap opera.

Medal of honor winners usually say it’s what everybody was doing. And the honor comes from going when called, not specifically from getting killed.

Lots of clicks from soap opera though, it’s just that it’s self-entertainment. I don’t think heroes would want it.

Feeling called specifically makes you you, it addresses you. You become unique and irreplaceable. That’s the moral component. Without that you’re nobody in particular.

The annual memorial makes the nation into women mostly.

    Does going to Auschwitz turn Jews into women?

    9/11 reminds me there’s a not-insignificant part of the world that wants me dead or in submission. It reminds me that my government is too feckless and weak to stop them and probably always will be. It reminds me to listen to that voice that says- be ready, this could all go sideways real fast and in a real bad way. I reminds me to kiss my wife and daughter every time we are going to be apart, even if it’s just going to run a quick errand.

    This 9/11 is especially painful because of who America voted for and what he just did to make the world more dangerous by 1000X.

    There’s an ammo shortage because a large part of the country that don’t behave like hysterical leftist crybabies.

      rhhardin in reply to Andy. | September 11, 2021 at 8:05 pm

      That’s victim porn. My suggestion on 9/11 is check all passengers for weapons, and if they don’t have one, give them one.

    texansamurai in reply to rhhardin. | September 12, 2021 at 11:11 am

    Medal of honor winners usually say it’s what everybody was doing. And the honor comes from going when called, not specifically from getting killed.
    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    would agree with this–the colossal distinction here, however, is that these people weren’t carrying any weapons, were not going into combat–instead they carried tools necessary to the saving of lives, to the rescue of our injured/trapped countrymen–they were in no way attempting to prevail by force of arms–and they were willing to risk their lives in the attempt–and that, in my humble opinion, is the highest form of valor

JohninPalmSprings | September 11, 2021 at 9:09 pm

Cannot thank you enough, seeing my brother’s picture today, listening to the reading of the names, thank
you so much for remembering them all.

My brother, Brian Christopher Hickey, was a hero, a husband, a father, a son, a brother, and the bravest man I’ve ever known.

Lots of tears today, thank you again for remembering.

John B. Hickey

Thanks, Professor, for keeping the flame of memory lit; may it never go out. National Geographic had a 9/11 special with recovered footage and interviewed people who played incidental parts in the disaster. One was a woman who checked Mohammed Atta out of a Comfort Inn in Maine on 9/11, another barely missed him when he nearly hit a gate going into the Portland Jetport parking garage, a ticket agent in Portland who told him he would have to go through security again in Boston because he his connection in Boston was in another terminal than the one to which he was arriving, and a baggage handler who recovered Atta’s bag when it missed getting put on Flight 11.

The most poignant was footage of the FDNY battalion chief at the World Trade Center on 9/11 with an interview of him twenty years later. The footage included periodic “thumps” of the bodies hitting the ground from the upper floors and of a FDNY lieutenant given orders to lead his team on a search and rescue of the building. The lieutenant left with his men and that was the last time the chief saw his younger brother. The chief saw the search and rescue team shake hands with each other before they set out, seemingly knowing it was a one-way mission. Such is the courage of men who go into burning buildings when others run out.

Thank you for sharing the post.

1) It applies equally to Shanksville and Arlington.

2) The health crisis of the ground zero workers was an avoidable tragedy for which Americans must take responsibility.

3) You correctly focused on names, not demographic data.

My house shook when the first plane hit the Tower. Turned on the TV to see what was going on ad saw the second plane hit. Every thing was shut down, For three days, all I could see was a trail of smoke running south towards the ocean. Everyone knew of someone killed on 9/11. Whether it be a friend , church member or neighbor. The local Asbury Park Press ran obituaries for one and a half years as DNA was identifying ashes from the Arthur Kill landfill.. The most interesting were the absent contrails from planes that would land at Newark liberty and JFK airports. There was a deafening silence. Nice tribute Professor Jacobson.

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