U.S. Attorney for Connecticut John Durham, who is investigating the origins of the Russia-Trump collusion probe, disagreed with a few aspects of Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz’s report released today.

“Based on the evidence collected to date, and while our investigation is ongoing, last month we advised the Inspector General that we do not agree with some of the report’s conclusions as to predication and how the FBI case was opened,” said Durham.

Durham reminded everyone in his statement that his investigation is not as limited as Horowitz’s investigation.

Durham’s “investigation has included developing information from other persons and entities, both in the U.S. and outside of the U.S.”

Reports came out in October that Durham’s investigation has become “a full-fledged criminal investigation.”

The change in Durham’s investigation happened after he “uncovered new evidence” on a trip to Rome with Attorney General Bill Barr:

Barr reportedly told embassy officials in Italy that he “needed a conference room to meet high-level Italian security agents where he could be sure no one was listening in.”

A source in the Italian Ministry of Justice told The Daily Beast earlier this month that Barr and Durham were played a taped deposition made by Joseph Mifsud, the professor who allegedly told ex-Trump aide George Papadopoulos that the Russians had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. Mifsud reportedly was explaining to investigators in the deposition why people would want to harm him, and why he needed police protection.

Papadopoulos has suggested he was connected with Mifsud as part of a setup orchestrated by intelligence agencies.

That distinction “means Durham can subpoena witnesses, file charges, and impanel fact-finding grand juries.”

 

 
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