My initial reaction to Robert Mueller’s congressional appearance was one of pity. He was a pathetic character on the stage, seemingly bewildered at times, mentally frail, and vulnerable as a witness.

What a way to end a career and to be remembered by friend and foe alike.

But emotion is not the way to assess what we saw. It’s not an overstatement to say that the Hillary-DNC-Fusion GPS-Steele operation, as embraced by influential members of the FBI and possibly intelligence services, compounded by leaks to and collusion of a willing media, came close to undermining a presidential election before and after Election Day.

In many ways the Mueller testimony confirmed our worst fears that the Mueller Investigation was the Mueller Investigation in name only, that it was run the way the pre-Mueller investigation of Trump was run — by people with a political agenda to override the 2016 election result, or at least to make sure it didn’t happen again in 2020. It’s a theme we’ve covered here pretty much since the Inauguration.

Whether Robert Mueller was a mere figurehead or in control, he was a participant. So while he was a sorry figure in the congressional hearings, and his appearance did substantial damage to Democrat and media plans, the gravity of what happened should not be lessened. It almost worked.

The media, of course, was a full participant in what happened. Just when you thought the major organizations who control almost all of popular and social media couldn’t get any worse, they do. This all takes place while high tech companies put the thumb on the scale by penalizing non-liberal content.

You know where I’m going, don’t you? Dread.

After Mueller had testified for several hours, and it was clear that it was a disaster for Democrats and the media, I was asked by someone who works in the neighborhood, knows about this website, and is a big Trump supporter, how it was going. We talked about the hearings for a little while, since he was unable to watch, then he asked me: “Do you still have hope?”

That simple question somewhat set me aback.

My answer, paraphrased:

Yes, I still have hope, but it’s hard. When the weight of the media, entertainment and educational industries is so hostile to non-liberals, and when it combines with the power of the state, it’s tough. It seems overwhelming at times. It’s emotionally and physically draining. And it’s been going on for several decades. Yet I still have hope despite that overwhelming disadvantage.

It’s almost unimaginable that after this decades-long onslaught, Republicans nonetheless control the Senate and the presidency, and most state legislatures.  How can that possibly be, it’s seemingly impossible. The American people are resilient, and that gives me hope.

But vigilance must be eternal, going to sleep politically even for a year or two is not an option. You cannot give an inch, or they’ll take a mile. And people need to be held accountable.

We’re doing construction at the house. The contractors we’re using told me they’ve never seen the economy this strong, that they can’t hire enough people for all the work they could get. Some of the workers blasted Rush Limbaugh on the radio. I smiled.

We can’t let the Mueller fiasco be forgotten. This was really dangerous, almost beyond imagination.

The investigators need to be investigated.

 
 
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