Shocking no one, those within the DC bubble cannot believe that approval numbers for President Donald Trump and Congressional GOP lawmakers continue to climb into February.

A Rasmussen poll has shown Trump’s approval rating at 49% while RealClearPolitics has it at 41.9%

Yes, unfathomable. The Daily Mail‘s David Martosko quickly reminded Wittes why:

Kemberlee blogged the day after the SOTU about the polls, which showed that the speech was a home run.

The CBS News poll found that 54% believed the policies Trump spoke about would help them personally. 75% approved of the SOTU.

The SOTU scored well with the Independents, too:

Let’s get into the tax reform that Trump and the GOP passed before the end of 2017. RealClearPolitics reported:

When Trump’s took office in January he had a +72 percent net approval rating among Republicans, a +6 percent rating among Independents, and -68 percent rating among Democrats. By summer’s end, those numbers had declined to +61, -21 and -73 percent, respectively. Significantly, his economic approval ratings hovered nearly 20 points above his overall ratings among Republicans and Independents, suggesting that voters might be willing to separate his handling of the economy from his general comportment in office. By the beginning of December, however, Trump’s economic rating had begun to resemble his overall numbers, falling to -5 percent among Independents, as compared to 0 percent in August 2017, and +9 percent in January 2017. On the subject area generally most important to Americans, Trump was losing ground.

Since the passage of the tax act, Trump has seen a reversal of fortune among Independents, and to a lesser extent among Republicans. On economic performance, he’s moved the dial upward, especially among Independents, and reduced his net negative ratings on the overall job approval to single digits.

A Monmouth University Poll confirmed the findings:

Asbury Park Press reported (emphasis mine):

“The president devoted a significant amount of the State of the Union address (to) touting a growing economy and his new tax plan. While there is still some way to go to really win over the public, it looks like the needle has moved in the Republicans’ direction since passage of the tax bill,” said Patrick Murray, director of the Monmouth University Polling Institute in West Long Branch.

The survey showed 47 percent of respondents said they would support a Democrat in the 2018 midterm elections and 45 percent would support a Republican candidate. In December, Democrats held a 15-point advantage, 51 percent to 36 percent, when voters were asked who they would support this fall.

“The generic Congressional ballot is prone to bouncing around for a bit until the campaign really gets underway later this year,” Murray said. “But Democrats who counted on riding public hostility toward the tax bill to retake the House may have to rethink that strategy,” said Murray.

How much you want to bet this message will fall on deaf ears? Democrats, especially Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, have continued to bash the tax cuts even as more and more companies have passed on their savings to their employees and expand. Pelosi called these moves pathetic and crumbs. Great way to show you care for the working class, ma’am.