Having called the Brexit referendum and resigned his post as Prime Minister in June, David Cameron announced today that he has resigned as MP, effective immediately.

The Telegraph reports:

David Cameron is standing down as MP for Witney, triggering a by-election in the Oxfordshire seat.

Mr Cameron’s decision comes two months after he quit as Prime Minister on July 13 in the wake of defeat in the EU referendum.

The Telegraph has Cameron’s statement on his decision:

“Having fully considered my position over the summer, I have decided that I am going to stand down as the Member of Parliament for Witney.

“There will now be a by-election and I will do everything that I can to help the Conservative candidate win that election.

“In my view, the circumstances of my resignation as Prime Minister and the realities of modern politics make it very difficult to continue on the backbenches without the risk of becoming a diversion to the important decisions that lie ahead for my successor in Downing Street and the Government.

“I fully support Theresa May and have every confidence that Britain will thrive under her strong leadership.”

Watch Cameron discuss his decision to stand down as MP:

For her part, Prime Minister May provides a statement thanking Cameron for his work for the Conservative Party.

The Telegraph continues:

“I was proud to serve in David Cameron’s government and under his leadership we achieved great things. Not just stabilising the economy but also making great strides in delivering serious social reform. His commitment to leading a one nation government is one that I will continue.

“I thank him for everything he has done for the Conservative party and the country and I wish him and his family well for the future.”

In his statement, Cameron notes that he hopes to continue to “contribute in terms of public service and of course contribute to this country that I love so much.”

The Guardian reports:

An ally of Cameron argued that his decision to step down was not meant to be a statement about May’s policies, but rather a move that would support the new Conservative leader.

They said the “speed of events” following the referendum prevented him from making this decision straight away, and he wanted to spend the summer considering his future. They added that Cameron would be focusing on “causes close to his heart”, including the anti-corruption agenda, transparency on aid, fighting dementia, schooling and life chances.