Anthony “Carlos Danger” Weiner‘s online sexual predator persona is very well known.  His lewd forays on social media made him a disgraced laughingstock, and he ultimately resigned his House seat and then withdrew his bid for mayor of New York City as a result.

The latest page in Weiner’s “cautionary tale of self destruction” includes a mongoose, porn scenes, strappy black heels, and an epic catfishing expedition.

The New York Post reports:

Sext fiend Anthony Weiner boasted of his animal prowess — claiming he was “deceptively strong . . . like a mongoose” — and gave his cellphone number to a college student during a flirty, private online chat on a recent trip to Los Angeles, The Post has learned.

But the joke was on the horndog pol, whose wife, Huma Abedin, is a top aide and close confidante of Hillary Clinton.

The target of his online affection was really a dude.

Catfishing occurs when someone online pretends to be someone they are not to lure unsuspecting people into a romantic and/or (cyber) sexual relationship.  The term became well-known in social media circles following the release of the film Catfish and the television series of the same name.

The New York Post continues:

A young Republican-turned- “catfish” baited the disgraced former congressman into chatting about “strappy black heels” and “porn scenes.” Weiner even made a cornball double entendre about his “staff.”

“Funny scene here,” Weiner writes in one of the Twitter direct messages, sent from his hotel room in LA, where he had traveled to appear on HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher.”

“I moved the tv so I could hear/see it while in the shower. I dropped it. Neighbor complained. Me Towel. Tv. Floor. And now concierge on the way.”

The student, a New Yorker ­using a female friend’s Twitter account and calling himself “Nikki,” responds, “Come out with just the towel on when he/she knocks, would pretty much = a tip for the concierge.”

Weiner referred to himself as a mongoose in the exchange—the exchange can be read in full here—and even included a “selfie” of a mongoose. At one point in the exchange he expresses a desire to show “Nikki” his “mongoose parts.”  He also sent two photos of women with their mouths open, the first with the message “Sexy, no?”.

The “catfish,” who heads a ­Republican club at his NYC-area college, called Weiner an easy mark.

“The first time was the charm,” he told The Post. All it took was to retweet one of Weiner’s posts and add a comment.

Within 20 minutes, Weiner ­responded.

“The amount of effort this took was the most alarming thing given his history,” he said.

“I was trying to think how to get him to say something stupid without making it so obvious.”

For his part, Weiner claims that he knew “Nikki” was catfishing him and regarded the exchange as a “playful joust with an obvious catfish.”  The exchange took place on two days (July 25 and July 27), with Weiner being the one to reach out when the conversation resumed on the 27th.