Dartmouth College students who are part of the Black Lives Matter movement recently staged a protest which invaded a school library. As we reported yesterday at College Insurrection, some students who were trying to study allege physical assault.

Campus Reform has the details:

Dartmouth students lead profane Black Lives Matter protest

Black-clad protesters gathered in front of Dartmouth Hall Thursday night, forming a crowd roughly one hundred fifty strong.

Ostensibly there to denounce the removal of shirts from a display in Collis, Dartmouth’s student center the Black Lives Matter collective began to sing songs and chant their eponymous catchphrase. The band then marched into Baker-Berry Library.

“F*** you, you filthy white f***s!”

“F*** you and your comfort!”

“F*** you, you racist s***!”

These shouted epithets were the first indication that many students had of the coming storm. The sign-wielding, obscenity-shouting protesters proceeded through the usually quiet backwaters of the library. They surged first through first-floor Baker-Berry, then up the stairs to the normally undisturbed floors of the building, before coming back down to the ground floor of Novak Café.

Throngs of protesters converged around fellow students who had not joined in their long march. They confronted students who bore “symbols of oppression” such as “gangster hats” and Beats-brand headphones…

Students who refused to listen to or join their outbursts were shouted down:“Stand the f*** up!” “You filthy racist white piece of s***!” Men and women alike were pushed and shoved by the group.

“If we can’t have it, shut it down!” they cried. Another woman was pinned to a wall by protesters who unleashed their insults, shouting “filthy white b****!” in her face.

In the immediate aftermath of the demonstration, social media was abuzz with comments condemning the protesters for their tactics.

Here’s a video from part of the incident:

Dartmouth College has two student newspapers.

The Dartmouth is the older, establishment paper and The Dartmouth Review is a younger, conservative publication. They offered dramatically different accounts of the protest.

Transcripts below, via Tom Blumer of NewsBusters:

The Dartmouth Review:

Eyes Wide Open at the Protest

Watching these events (University of Missouri, Yale, etc. — Ed.) unfold from Hanover, no one could have doubted that the (Black Lives Matter-backed campus protest) movement would make its way to Dartmouth within the week. But the particular form that our own iteration took on the night of November 12 was a shock, even to the by-now seasoned souls of students who have witnessed the past years. The tactics, tone, and words of the Black Lives Matter protesters eerily mirrored everything they claim to stand against. The long list of their clear oversteps should spark a moment of reckoning for every honest onlooker, and especially those who have sympathized with their movement to this point.

The Protest…

Black-clad protesters gathered in front of Dartmouth Hall, forming a crowd roughly one hundred fifty strong. Ostensibly there to denounce the removal of shirts from a display in Collis, the Black Lives Matter collective began to sing songs and chant their eponymous catchphrase. Not content to merely demonstrate there for the night, the band descended from their high-water mark to march into Baker-Berry Library.

“F*** you, you filthy white f***s!” “F*** you and your comfort!” “F*** you, you racist s***!”

The Dartmouth:

Students stage a protest in solidarity with Missouri and Yale, drawing both support and controversy

Chants of “We shall overcome” and “Black Lives Matter” echoed through the Green yesterday evening as more than 150 students, faculty, staff and community members dressed in black, walked from Novack Café to Dartmouth Hall in a demonstration of solidarity with the black communities at University of Missouri and Yale University and the larger Black Lives Matter movement…

A group first met at the Afro-American Society then headed to Novack Cafe. The group walked to the lawn in front of Dartmouth Hall, where several students shared their feelings and experiences. At that point, the official protest ended, but many students wanted to continue moving throughout campus, (Jonathan) Diakanwa said. As an organizer, he moved with the group to provide supervision and direction.

… Some students who were at the library at the time said they felt uncomfortable with the disruption caused by the protest. Some of the demonstrators called out specific students who were studying for not standing up and joining the protest or not wearing black. One student said at one point he was concerned over the possibility of violence, while another said that he called Safety and Security because he was annoyed by the disruption.

Those are remarkably different reports, aren’t they?

No matter which version you believe, one thing is becoming clear: it is way past time for Dartmouth and other schools to address this situation.

No one is opposed to peaceful campus protests; they’re part of a rich tradition in higher education. If however, a protest prevents other students from studying, that’s not fair.

Finally, if the allegations of assault at Dartmouth are true, the appropriate response is expulsion.

Featured image via YouTube.