Oh, thaaaaaatttttt historically underrepresented group. Not the one you were thinking of.

Via CNN:

Sen. Elizabeth Warren told CNN she has been treated differently as a woman in the clubby upper chamber — echoing the general sentiments of her colleague Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who wrote about sexism in the Senate in a recent book.

During a wide-ranging interview on the Colorado campaign trail—where she was stumping for endangered incumbent Sen. Mark Udall—CNN asked Warren whether she had experienced any different treatment as a woman. “Yes,” she said. Would she elaborate? “Nope.” But was it surprising? “Not really, I wish it were,” she told CNN. “But it’s hard to change these big, male dominated institutions. What I am very happy about is that there are now enough women in the United States Senate to bring change to that place and I think that’s just powerfully important.” There are now 20 women in the senate.

Warren added: “You know, others have said it before me. If you don’t have a seat at the table, you’re probably on the menu.” Warren’s comments did make one clear case: women will be treated as equals when there continue to be more women in the Senate.

Warren didn’t want to talk specifics, or how the different treatment manifested itself. “I’ve said all I am going to say,” ending that part of the conversation. In the book, Gillibrand recounted specific details of unnamed male senators remarking about her appearance—even squeezing her waist.

So who are the bullies? Bryan Preston points out the obvious — if they were Republicans, she’d be naming names:

Well, we can all infer what’s going on here. If the culprit or culprits were Republicans, Warren, false Indian and darling of the far left, would not hesitate to name them and call them out. No doubt about it. Her accusation would resurrect the phony “war on women” with less than two weeks to go before the election.

So the culprits must be Warren’s fellow Democrats. That’s why she has said all she’ll say about it.