I have been very grateful for the media experience gained by being a contributor at Legal Insurrection and the Executive Producer for Canto Talk.

Professor Jacobson has been a big inspiration behind a project I have been working on and which is now ready to launch:  History Bytes.

The tagline of this new, pay-for-podcast program is “where the tides of history crash into the shores of current events”.

During discussions about today’s news, listeners and readers often have questions about the historical reasons behind the developments being reported.  I have partnered with Barry Jacobsen, author of “Deadliest Blogger,” former associate producer of SpikeTV’s “Deadliest Warrior,” and frequent guest/co-host on Canto Talk to delve into the events and personalities of the past in an attempt to unveil the reasons behind the headlines we now see.

Consider it a“History Insurrection” – we cover real history of interest to independent and conservative listeners.

Here is an example of how it works: We have been closely following what is happening with the Russian annexation of Crimea.

The most recent History Bytes show puts these events into context:

Show #005: In the Shadow of the Bear
Military history expert Barry Jacobsen discusses the history of the Black Sea region of Russia, including:

  • The era of Genghis Khan and the Golden Horde.
  • The forced exodus of the Crimean Tartars on the orders of Joseph Stalin.
  • The rationale behind Vladimir Putin’s power grab in Georgia.
  • The development of Islamic extremism in Chechnya and its consequences.
  • The origins of the Ukraine’s “Orange Revolution”

Barry and I hope you will join us.  Click HERE for a link to the website, which also has shows featuring Sparta, Alexander the Great, and Egyptomania.  We will be doing a few shows monthly; the next one will discuss the historical evidence associated with the Exodus.

History Bytes can also be found on other social media platforms:

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HISTORY BYTES – FACEBOOK

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@HistoryBytes – TWITTER

If it is successful enough, perhaps we can convince one of our favorite professors to try something similar?

Those of you unfamiliar with “Deadliest Warrior,” which uses computer simulations, medical analysis, and mock battles to determine which of two historical combatants would win when pitted against each other, might enjoy a clip from the show: