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Southern Illinois U. Prof Indicted for Allegedly Hiding Ties to Chinese Government

Southern Illinois U. Prof Indicted for Allegedly Hiding Ties to Chinese Government

“If convicted, Xiao faces up to 45 years in prison and $750,000 in fines.”

I’ve lost count of how many times this sort of thing has happened over the last two years. We clearly have a problem here.

The College Fix reports:

Southern Illinois mathematics professor indicted for hiding support from Chinese government

A mathematics professor at Southern Illinois University – Carbondale was indicted Wednesday on two counts of wire fraud and one count of making a false statement after it was learned he had concealed ties to the Chinese government in order to secure a loan from the National Science Foundation.

Mingqing Xiao (pictured), of Makanda, Ill., obtained a loan of $151,099 from the NSF while also receiving a grant from the Chinese government, according to the indictment.

“Fraudulently obtaining U.S. taxpayer funding is a slap in the face to the vast majority of university researchers who do the right thing and abide by the rules,” said Assistant Director of the FBI’s Counterintelligence Division Alan E. Kohler, Jr. in a statement following announcement of the charges.

“To those individuals who choose to conceal affiliations with foreign universities or foreign governments while applying for U.S. taxpayer-funded grants, the message should be clear: the FBI and its partners are aggressively investigating allegations of grant fraud.”

If convicted, Xiao faces up to 45 years in prison and $750,000 in fines.

According to the FBI, Xiao has worked in SIUC’s mathematics department since 2000, focusing his research primarily on partial differential equations, control theory, optimization theory, dynamical systems, and computational science.

In 2019, when he applied for a NSF grant for a project slated to run between 2019 and 2022, Xiao failed to inform the foundation that he was also on the payroll of Shenzhen University, and that he had received a previous grant from the Natural Science Foundation of China. Further, he had already committed to teaching at Shenzhen University from 2018 to 2023.

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