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Course at Syracuse U. Questions Whether Higher Education Should Stop Teaching Shakespeare

Course at Syracuse U. Questions Whether Higher Education Should Stop Teaching Shakespeare

“issues of race, empire, colonialism, and white supremacy in Shakespeare and the academy”

It’s always hilarious to see modern academics judging one of the greatest writers who ever lived.

Campus Reform reports:

Syracuse course questions whether academia should stop teaching Shakespeare

Syracuse University is offering a course in the English Department this Fall, entitled “Why Shakespeare? Race in the Academy.”

According to its description, the course aims to answer the question, “Should we learn Shakespeare?” Students will discuss “issues of race, empire, colonialism, and white supremacy in Shakespeare and the academy,” inspiring “powerful arguments for and against learning Shakespeare.”

“By reading plays and poems alongside recent scholarship from the #ShakeRace and RaceB4Race® movements, we will critically address the questions of when, how, and why Shakespeare is taught, performed, remixed, and reclaimed,” the course description continues.

RaceB4Race® advertises itself as an “ongoing conference series and professional network community by and for scholars of color working on issues of race in premodern literature, history, and culture.” According to its website, the group “centers the expertise, perspectives, and sociopolitical interests of BIPOC scholars, whose work seeks to expand critical race theory.”

The course instructor, Aley O’Mara, is an English PhD candidate studying “queer asexuality in the literature of Shakespeare’s time.” According the university’s website, O’Mara’s dissertation argues that “English Reformation’s hostility toward celibacy set the stage for heterosexual marriage culture as we now know it.”

“For that reason, sympathetic representations of celibacy could enact resistance to heteronormativity.”

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Comments

O’Mara’s dissertation argues that “English Reformation’s hostility toward celibacy set the stage for heterosexual marriage culture as we now know it.”

“For that reason, sympathetic representations of celibacy could enact resistance to heteronormativity.”

That’s an awful lot of words for “no one wants to f*ck me”.

    The Friendly Grizzly in reply to daniel_ream. | April 28, 2021 at 7:51 pm

    That, and apparently, someone must be teaching classes in how to devise poly-syllabic compound nonsense words.

Yeah, yeah, yeah, it’s all fun and games until the greatest playwright in the history of the English language gets it in the neck from someone who purports to love that language.

It’s positively Shakespearean.

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