Schools are closed, churches are limited in the size of the congregation, we are all told to stay at home and to wear a mask when outside out homes (or else!), and President Trump is kept from holding rallies . . . all purportedly due to the Wuhan coronavirus.


As we all know, however, the leftist riots continue in cities across the nation, and now, there are reports that a huge Black Lives Matter march is planned for August 28th in DC.

An estimated 100,000 persons are already expected to be in attendance, but don’t expect anyone in the media to comment on yet another enormous gathering during a global pandemic that is being used to keep everyone who is not a radical anti-American Marxist locked in their homes.

From the dcist article (archive link):

In fact, there’s a planned march with at least 100,000 participants expected to be in attendance, along with multiple organizations and activists involved. Here’s what we know, so far, about the plans for later this summer:

Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network (NAN) has scheduled a march with an estimated 100,000 participants, 1,000 buses, a host of jumbotrons and lighting equipment, and at least 10 tents on or near the National Mall, according to a permit application from early June obtained by DCist.

The event, officially titled the “Get Off Our Necks” Commitment March on Washington, already has at least 40,000 registrants, and some hotels nearby have already been sold out, according to NAN’s D.C. Bureau Chief Ebonie Riley.

“The influx of inquiries has been relentless,” Riley told DCist over email. “We are in a similar climate like August of 1963. Some of the same issues that took place then are taking place now. In 1963, the purpose of the march was to advocate for the civil and economic rights of Black people, and that’s still relevant.”

She describes the march as part of an intergenerational and inclusive movement, and that it will be led by families of Black people killed by police officers. This summer’s event is “only a launching pad to the work ahead,” she added.

. . . . Meanwhile, a list of NPS permit applicants for Aug. 28 features an eclectic mix of smaller groups planning to support the march, including: Black Girls Ride, a motorcycle caravan; members of the Black fraternal order Improved Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the World; and Vote Common Good, a left-leaning Christian organization joining a 140-mile pilgrimage from Charlottesville to D.C.

Apparently, there is some question about what the DC mayor will do since this flouts both her existing and new Wuhan coronavirus orders.

It’s unclear how the plans for the march might conflict with Mayor Muriel Bowser’s new order requiring people coming to D.C. from “high-risk” states to self-quarantine for 14 days. (The list of states will be released on July 27, when the order goes into effect, and it will be updated every two weeks.) Bowser’s mandate is expected to extend to at least October, the current end date for the city’s public health emergency. Phase Two of the District’s reopening plan currently bans mass gatherings of more than 50 people.

The mayor’s office didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment about the intersection of her restrictions and the planned march. For the better part of two months, though, D.C.-area activists have already been weighing the risks of participating in BLM demonstrations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ah, so certain people get to weigh their own risks all by themselves.  When anti-lockdown, actually-peaceful protests took place for that very privilege to be extended to all of us, the left melted down at the sight of significantly fewer than 100,000 people gathered in one place.  They spent days whining about the president’s Arizona rally, and lobbied hard to get an in-person Republican convention cancelled.  Funny how that works.

We’ll see how this DC march unfolds, but if this mass gathering is permitted to go ahead, I think there will be an awful lot of already angry people across the country becoming a whole lot more angry.

 

 
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