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Parents Charged in College Admissions Scandal Turn to ‘Prison Consultant’

Parents Charged in College Admissions Scandal Turn to ‘Prison Consultant’

“They’re scared and it’s ‘Can I survive in prison? Am I cut out for prison?'”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btQ_l-S3T0c

These parents are scared of how they’ll fare in prison. Luckily, they have the resources to hire a consultant to help them.

CBS News reports:

Parents charged in college cheating scam turn to consultant to understand prison life

The most high-profile defendants charged in the massive college admissions scandal are due in federal court Wednesday afternoon. Actresses Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman are among the 15 parents expected to go before a judge, accused of cheating to get their kids into elite universities.

Loughlin, who has remained tight-lipped about her legal strategy ahead of her federal court appearance, and her husband designer Mossimo Giannulli, are accused of paying half a million dollars to get their two daughters into USC by having them labeled as recruits to the school’s crew team.

Huffman is charged with paying the scheme’s alleged mastermind, Rick Singer, $15,000 to have a proctor correct her daughter’s SATs. We’re learning some parents may be considering plea deals and are seeking advice on time spent behind bars from a former convicted felon to help them make that decision.

Justin Paperny is a former stockbroker who served prison time for fraud and now works with wealthy clients as a prison consultant. He told CBS News has been hired by one parent charged in the scheme and is in talks with several others.

“They’re scared and it’s ‘Can I survive in prison? Am I cut out for prison?'” Paperny said. “What’s most surprising to me about the first conversation is how many of them didn’t view their actions as criminal.”

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Comments

healthguyfsu | April 11, 2019 at 8:34 am

“What’s most surprising to me about the first conversation is how many of them didn’t view their actions as criminal.”

Yeah, that blows those contrition statements right out the window.

Mr. Prison consultant might want to be a bit more discrete if he wants to keep his new revenue stream flowing.

Oversoul Of Dusk | April 11, 2019 at 8:39 am

Never in a million years would I have guessed that there are “prison consultants”.

I shall now go re-think the whole Easter Bunny question.

I am still confused as to what they did that was illegal? They paid money to a guy to perform a service, and then that guy paid off people to falsify docuemnts, etc. How is that considered money laundering? Now if the guy takes the money and doesn’t report it as income, I can see where he would be in trouble with the IRS. But how does that come back on the parents? Is there any difference between the parents doing this at a publicly funded vs a privately funded university? people have donated money to the schools since pretty much the beginning of time in order to get their kids in, and in those cases, the money was most likely a tax write-off as well. So while I see all this as unethical and sleazy, I am just not sure where the criminal part comes in to play. It seems that this is really a private affair between the colleges and their employees, and that the colleges should simply be able to fire said employees and un-admit the students who took this path. And the other scandal should be with any testing agency whose credibility now comes into question. But again, isn’t this more on the level of a class action lawsuit wherein services as advertised were not provided?

A prison consultant? Is he advising them to bribe the guards to get a better cellmate?

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