President Donald Trump signed a presidential permit to initiate the construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline with a facility in Montana, the building of which has been delayed by a federal court order and an injunction.

The permit authorizes energy company TransCanada Corp. to “construct, connect, operate, and maintain” pipeline facilities between the U.S. and Canada.

The permit also allows for the maintenance of a pipeline facility at Phillips County, Montana, for importation of the oil to the U.S.

The order supersedes a March 2017 order. That permit was invalidated by a Montana federal judge in November. The ruling is being appealed in the 9th Circuit. Separately, a December lawsuit placed an injunction on most pre-construction activities.

“For the avoidance of doubt, I hereby revoke that March 23, 2017, permit,” Trump wrote in Friday’s order.

A White House spokesperson told The Hill that the new permit “dispels any uncertainty.”

The Keystone XL pipeline has been on hold for more than a decade after environmental reviews.

Furthermore, Obama outright rejected the project, using global warming and “we can’t drill our way” to prosperity as excuses. Trump, on the other hand, is said to want “to create jobs and advance U.S. energy security.”

Friday’s permission was the latest move in the Trump administration’s pursuit of what it calls “energy dominance,” or maximizing production of oil, gas and coal for domestic use and exports to allies and trading partners. The administration has rolled back environmental regulations on emissions from power plants and vehicles and opened up federal lands to drilling and mining.

Russ Girling, TransCanada’s president and chief executive officer, said in a release that Trump “has been clear that he wants to create jobs and advance U.S. energy security and the Keystone XL pipeline does both of those things.”

Legal Insurrection readers may recall our stories on the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the associated “Burning Man”-style protests. Interestingly, states are now cracking down on these green justice warriors, which could impact the Keystone XL project.

Bills to clamp down on pipeline protests have spread to at least nine new states this year, part of an industry-backed push that began two years ago to heighten penalties for activists who try to block fossil fuel infrastructure projects.

Several of the bills also allow prosecutors to go after people or organizations as “conspirators” or “riot boosters” for merely supporting or coordinating with others who violate the law.

…The latest government move came on Wednesday in South Dakota—one of the states the planned Keystone XL pipeline is slated to cross—when Republican Gov. Kristi Noem signed a law that enables state and local governments, as well as “third parties,” to seek civil damages from people or organizations that engage in “riot boosting.”

That this decision is in the best interest of Americans can be confirmed by the reaction in social media.

It seems the only thing flowing faster than our oil nowadays is liberal tears.