Rep. Steve King (R-IA) is no stranger to racial controversy and it’s nice to see the Republican party finally doing something about it. The Republicans have booted King from committees after he told The New York Times, “White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” From Fox News:

“We will not tolerate this type of language in the Republican Party … or in the Democratic Party as well,” House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told reporters. “I watched what Steve King said and we took action.”

In a formal statement, McCarthy said King’s comments were “beneath the dignity of the Party of Lincoln and the United States of America. His comments call into question whether he will treat all Americans equally, without regard for race and ethnicity. House Republicans are clear: We are all in this together, as fellow citizens equal before God and the law. As Congressman King’s fellow citizens, let us hope and pray earnestly that this action will lead to greater reflection and ultimately change on his part.”

In a statement of his own, King insisted that his comments had been “completely mischaracterized” and blasted McCarthy for what King called “a political decision that ignores the truth.” According to his website, King was previously a member of House committees on the judiciary, agriculture and small business.

Even Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) agreed:

Senate Republicans also expressed their disgust with King, with Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., saying that if King “doesn’t understand why ‘white supremacy’ is offensive, he should find another line of work.”

“There is no place in the Republican Party, the Congress or the country for an ideology of racial supremacy of any kind,” McConnell said. “I have no tolerance for such positions and those who espouse these views are not supporters of American ideals and freedoms. Rep. King’s statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position.”

Like I said, this is not the first time King has shown sympathy for white supremacists:

In November, King drew a strong rebuke from the chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee after making a string of comments and retweets relating to white nationalists and supremacists.

King had publicly endorsed a white nationalist candidate for mayor in Toronto. The candidate, Faith Goldy, has promoted books espousing anti-Semitic ideas and defending the white supremacist “14 words” slogan, according to the Toronto Star.

King also has drawn criticism for posts on Twitter, such as in 2017 when he wrote that “culture and demographics are our destiny” and said we “can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.”

And in September, King came under renewed scrutiny after traveling to Austria and giving an interview in which he said, “If we don’t defend Western Civilization, then we will become subjugated by the people who are the enemies of faith, the enemies of justice.”