Hungary has decided to quit the United Nations migration pact ahead of its final approval. Hungarian Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto slammed the UN-backed accord as a “threat to the world” and “entirely against” his country’s national interests.

“This document is entirely against Hungary’s security interests,” he said. “This pact poses a threat to the world from the aspect that it could inspire millions [of illegal migrants].”

By pulling out of the agreement, Hungary becomes the first European country to align itself with the United States on the issue. Both countries will not be joining 191 UN member nations at the signing of the formal document, due to take place at a ceremony in the Muslim-majority country of Morocco at the end of this year.

Last December, President Donald Trump’s administration withdrew the US out of the UN pact. “We simply cannot in good faith support a process that could undermine the sovereign right of the United States to enforce our immigration laws and secure our borders,” Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson said at that time.

Germany’s dpa news agency reported:

Hungary will withdraw from the UN Global Compact for Migration before it comes into effect, Foreign Minister Peter Szijjarto said Wednesday in Budapest following a government meeting. (…)

“This package goes against Hungary’s common sense and interests,” said Szijjarto. The agreement supports migration and considers it to be a human right, which, according to the minister, is unacceptable from Hungary’s point of view.

The text of the new treaty was agreed at the UN General Assembly last Friday, and aims to create a worldwide framework for managing migration. The Global Compact for Migration will be signed in Morocco in December.

Coincidentally, the UN started drafting this so-called “Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration” shortly after President Trump took up office, which raises the question if the pact is designed to ram down aggressive immigration policies amid a surge in nationalist sentiments across the Western World.

The UN has repeatedly attacked Hungary for its restrictive immigration policy towards “refugees,” mostly sturdy fighting-age men from Arab and Muslim countries.

Last April, the UN refugee agency told the European Union countries not to send migrants to Hungary, citing “deep concerns” over country’s stringent immigration law.

Germany and France are pushing for a grand “EU migrant relocation and resettlement scheme” that will force the bloc’s 28 member states to open their borders to hundreds of thousands of migrants. So far, Hungary and other Eastern European states have managed to frustrate such mass relocation measures–attracting ire from the leaders in Paris and Berlin.

Last month, French President Emmanuel Macron threatened sanctions against the EU member states that refuse to accept immigrants. “I am in favor of sanctions being imposed in the event of no cooperation” on migrant relocation, Macron said. Former German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel has also favored similar sanctions against Hungary and other EU countries unwilling to “shoulder the burden” and accept their “fair share” of immigrants.

What seems like a two-pronged assault, the UN has joined the EU in displaying open hostility towards Prime Minister Orbán’s government. “It is time to stand up to the bullies of Mr Orbán’s ilk,” the UN  human rights chief Zeid al-Hussein declared earlier this year. Zeid, also a Jordanian prince, called Hungary’s democratically elected leader a “racist” and “xenophobe.”

Prime Minister Orban isn’t taking these attacks lying down. By defying the mass relocation of migrants into his country, he is standing up to the liberal globalist agenda.

Ahead of the April general election, Orbán’s government ran a nationwide billboard campaign with the message: “The UN wants us to accept migrants on a continuous basis. Hungary Decides, Not the UN!” Orbán won that election in a landslide, winning nearly half of the vote and a two-thirds majority in the country’s parliament.

“We are working on building an old-school Christian democracy, rooted in European traditions” Orbán said after his election victory. “We believe in the importance of the nation and in Hungary we do not want to yield ground to any supranational business or political empire.”

If the UN despises Hungary’s restrictive immigration laws, it loves Germany’s open door immigration policy.

The UN immigration czar Peter Sutherland holds German Chancellor Angela Merkel as a role model for other world leaders to follow. “In my opinion Mrs Merkel is a hero,” said Sutherland, the outgoing UN special representative for international migration and long-time Goldman Sachs boss.

Hungary’s longest serving post-communist prime minister, Orbán, is a hero in his own right. While the EU bigwigs like Federica Mogherini and José Barroso started their political careers in the European Communist parties, Orban fought to end the Communist dictatorship in his country.

When Orbán was out on the streets risking his life, Merkel was loyally serving the East German Communist Party; at one time reportedly acting as the secretary for “Agitation and Propaganda” at a local party unit.

As fate would have it, Orbán and Merkel are once again on the opposing sides of the barricade. And like in the days of the Cold War, Europe’s fate is again in the hands of men like Orbán.

Video: Hungary’s Orban calls for global alliance against mass immigration [March 2018]

[Cover image via YouTube]