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Report: DOJ IG Sends Criminal Referral of McCabe to U.S. Attorney of DC

Report: DOJ IG Sends Criminal Referral of McCabe to U.S. Attorney of DC

The IG found McCabe lacked candor four times when he discussed telling WSJ about the Clinton Foundation investigation.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Andrew_G._McCabe.jpg

CNN has reported that the Department of Justice’s inspector general sent a criminal referral of former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe to the US attorneys office in DC.

Last week, the IG office published its report on McCabe revealing that McCabe authorized a leak to The Wall Street Journal in an attempt to boost himself, but lied to investigators and former FBI Director James Comey.

*This is a breaking story. Will update accordingly.

No one from McCabe’s camp, the DOJ, or the US attorney’s office has supplied a comment. They all declined to provide one to CNN.

We don’t know if the attorney’s office responded to the referral or if they are conducting their own investigation. A referral does not guarantee the person involved will be charged with anything.

The IG found four times McCabe “lacked candor.” The report said:

We also found that on May 9, 2017, when questioned under oath by FBI agents from INSD, McCabe lacked candor when he told the agents that he had not authorized the disclosure to the WSJ and did not know who did. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath).

We further found that on July 28, 2017, when questioned under oath by the OIG in a recorded interview, McCabe lacked candor when he stated: (a) that he was not aware of Special Counsel having been authorized to speak to reporters around October 30 and (b) that, because he was not in Washington, D.C., on October 27 and 28, 2016, he was unable to say where Special Counsel was or what she was doing at that time. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath).

We additionally found that on November 29, 2017, when questioned under oath by the OIG in a recorded interview during which he contradicted his prior statements by acknowledging that he had authorized the disclosure to the WSJ, McCabe lacked candor when he: (a) stated that he told Comey on October 31, 2016, that he had authorized the disclosure to the WSJ; (b) denied telling INSD agents on May 9 that he had not authorized the disclosure to the WSJ about the PADAG call; and (c) asserted that INSD’s questioning of him on May 9 about the October 30 WSJ article occurred at the end of an unrelated meeting when one of the INSD agents pulled him aside and asked him one or two questions about the article. This conduct violated FBI Offense Code 2.6 (Lack of Candor – Under Oath).

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Comments

“Lack of candor.” Is that another way of saying he lied? this should be fun.

    MJN1957 in reply to floridaman. | April 19, 2018 at 3:28 pm

    I think the FBI rules are:

    “Lied” = name for what ‘regular people’ do when they ‘lack candor’ to FBI Agents…see “Federal Crime”

    and

    “Lack of Candor” = name for what FBI Agents do they ‘lie’ to each other…see “Permissible Office Jocularity”.

    NGAREADER in reply to floridaman. | April 19, 2018 at 4:05 pm

    Martha Stewart and others might get some small satisfaction seeing this.
    The question is, will he be charged or convicted of a charge as have many other (non-FBI) people?

The left is already going ballistic. The main headline is all about his pension. Frankly it should have been pulled the day he was fired.

Merriam-Webster (online)
Candor:
1) Unreserved, honest, or sincere expression : forthrightness

2) freedom from prejudice or malice : fairness

Nothing about truth or honesty. Isn’t that exactly like the guvmnt elite, to use a word like “candid” which is loaded with gray and interpretation rather than truth/honesty which is much more specific/accurate/absolute.

You either told the truth or you didn’t. You were forthright or you were evasive. You were open and honest or you weaseled your way around it. Candid my ass.

    forksdad in reply to tiger66. | April 19, 2018 at 7:35 pm

    They use words like candor because lying under oath is a crime and a violation of FBI standards. Every case he ever testified on would be up for grabs.

    Now his buddies don’t have to charge him.

regulus arcturus | April 19, 2018 at 3:36 pm

WaPoo has reported that “…the referral took place some time ago…”

Buckle up – we could see an indictment imminently (tomorrow afternoon?).

This barely counts as an appetizer.

Hey Cheff!
When are you cooking the big fish?

Trump just pardoned Scooter Libby for his conviction of lying to the FBI in the Valarie Plame investigation. “I don’t know Mr. Libby,” Trump said in a White House statement, “but for years I have heard that he has been treated unfairly. Hopefully, this full pardon will help rectify a very sad portion of his life.” Trump said.

So Trump issues pardons with no knowledge of the background and circumstance. I fear that he may also be doing the same in setting up McCabe to be prosecuted likely with direct orders to Sessions. The really strange thing is that the government has to believe Comey over McCabe to come to this conclusion. If Donald had any reasoning skills, he might exclaim, “Huh.”

    MarkS in reply to gad-fly. | April 19, 2018 at 4:28 pm

    Apparently you post comments with no knowledge of the background, circumstances, or the law!

    Publius Redux in reply to gad-fly. | April 19, 2018 at 4:59 pm

    Hey Gad-fly-tard,

    perhaps you should learn how to read and not just spit fake news lies. Trump was referring to the fact he didn’t know Scooter Libby personally, not that he didn’t’t know anything about the case.

    Here are the actual remarks (from Vox for God’s sake, which has more honesty than you do – which shows you what a vile disgusting human you are):

    Today, President Donald J. Trump issued an Executive Grant of Clemency (Full Pardon) to I. “Scooter” Lewis Libby, former Chief of Staff to Vice President Richard Cheney, for convictions stemming from a 2007 trial. President George W. Bush commuted Mr. Libby’s sentence shortly after his conviction. Mr. Libby, nevertheless, paid a $250,000 fine, performed 400 hours of community service, and served two years of probation.

    In 2015, one of the key witnesses against Mr. Libby recanted her testimony, stating publicly that she believes the prosecutor withheld relevant information from her during interviews that would have altered significantly what she said. The next year, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals unanimously reinstated Mr. Libby to the bar, reauthorizing him to practice law. The Court agreed with the District of Columbia Disciplinary Counsel, who stated that Mr. Libby had presented “credible evidence” in support of his innocence, including evidence that a key prosecution witness had “changed her recollection of the events in question.”

    Before his conviction, Mr. Libby had rendered more than a decade of honorable service to the Nation as a public servant at the Department of State, the Department of Defense, and the White House. His record since his conviction is similarly unblemished, and he continues to be held in high regard by his colleagues and peers.

    In light of these facts, the President believes Mr. Libby is fully worthy of this pardon. “I don’t know Mr. Libby,” said President Trump, “but for years I have heard that he has been treated unfairly. Hopefully, this full pardon will help rectify a very sad portion of his life.”

    Please note the words “In light of these facts” which you omitted from your feeble smear attempt.

    So for not actually knowing anything, or actually reading, or actually having a brain that is not a leftarded mess of scrambled eggs and nothingness you get an:

    F-

    tom_swift in reply to gad-fly. | April 19, 2018 at 6:14 pm

    You’re rather simple-minded.

    When he said, “I don’t know Mr. Libby,” Trump wasn’t claiming to be ignorant of the facts of the case. He was making it clear that the President’s pardon power was not being abused as a “get out of jail free” for his personal buddies.

Quick Andy, write a book!

Things are happening to fast to follow. Giuliani is moving on the horizon.

The beginning.

While I certainly hope that some of these people are charged and brought to trial, I don’t really expect it to happen. It is a shame that from what we have seen and has been reported there is a nasty smell from the FBI leadership, as there is from the FBI leadership, as well as from other high areas in our government.

Claims will be made that this will tear our country apart if they go to trial, yet lack of clarity on them bearing responsibility for what certainly looks like crimes, and their getting away with these acts, are tearing apart the country.

We are supposed to be equal under the law, yet we are not seeing that. If they get off without a trial, or at the very least an investigation as big and loud as the Mueller circus, then it sure looks like they are above the law.

I hope I am pleasantly surprised by indictments coming and trails to commence, but I am not at this point counting on it.

    Subotai Bahadur in reply to oldgoat36. | April 20, 2018 at 12:53 am

    No one expects indictments, because regardless of “party”, if you are one of the UniParty, you are immune from any law. We have decades of experience. If and when he gets off, there is no reason for any of the peasantry to obey any law except at gunpoint, and only if unarmed.

notamemberofanyorganizedpolicital | April 19, 2018 at 8:43 pm

“It’s Begun.”

The Beginning of the End.

Dominoes.

https://theconservativetreehouse.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/domino-fall-2.jpg

The Last Refuge

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