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Musical Aida Victim of “Cultural Appropriation”

Musical Aida Victim of “Cultural Appropriation”

Production cancelled at Bristol University because of race-based drama.

Nothing is safe from race-based drama!

This week started with Aleister reporting on Penn State’s costume-shaming campaign targeting Halloween garb.

However, despite the fact that a Muslim leader originally commissioned the work and the opera has been performed over 1,000 times since its debut in 1886, a British university is shutting down a musical based on Giuseppi Verdi’s Aida due amid charges of…cultural appropriation.

It is a story of war between two nations, the conflict of love rivals and the looming fate of death.

But the antagonistic themes of Aida seem to have spilled into the wings after a student production of the musical Aida was cancelled amid a row over suggestions of “cultural appropriation”.

A theatre at the University of Bristol said yesterday it had cancelled all showings after a revolt by students.

The musical version, by Tim Rice and Elton John, centers around an Ethiopian princess, Aida, who is held prisoner in Egypt. There were accusations of “white-washing” (i.e., assigning white students the roles of non-white characters).

Perhaps the fact the school is located on the British Isles, filled with white people, might have been a limiting factor in the diversity of the cast choices? Here is the cast as it was assembled:

li-30-aida-cast

Any university that allows operas and musicals to be the victims of student-organized social justice warfare can no longer be considered a serious institution of higher learning.

This sentiment has been appropriated by others:

One outraged Facebook user wrote in response: ‘The cancelling of this production of Aida on the grounds of “cultural appropriation” is outrageous censorship of the worst variety.

‘Aida is a great work of art and belongs to the world. The whole student body is the looser here.’

Conrad Young, of Bristol Against Censorship, told the Tab: ‘although MTB seemed to approach a sensitive topic with great humility and care, Aida was not to be.

‘The affect that the fear of cultural appropriation has on modern campuses is a sad affair and in this case has damaged the student experience of the people involved and the prospective student audiences.’

Or, as one Brit put it:

Consider everything that goes into the making of a grand opera: Orchestration, singing, costuming, stage design, choreography. Aida is an iconic masterpiece, and its production would have enhanced the resumes of any student who participated and enriched the lives of anyone who saw it as well.

Additionally, the university could have reaped some profits in ticket sales. Nearly everyone loves stories of ancient Egypt…as the enduring success of Aida shows.

So, when the affected art students find themselves working as baristas and living in basements, they can thank the race dramatists for their lifestyle. And when the university has to cut its art budget, administrations can also thank race-baiting activists.

Sadly, this isn’t likely to be the last race-based drama on campuses, either. What a tragedy.

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Comments

These people want to force a new Dark Age on the world.

Screw ’em. Put on the production anyhow.

Perhaps the fact the school is located on the British Isles, filled with white people, might have been a limiting factor in the diversity of the cast choices?

They could have had some of the actors in black face.

Oh, wait…

The Red Guard v2.0.

Hmmm. Has Elton John said anything about this?

Will they require that the Mikado be preformed by an all Japanese cast?

    Milwaukee in reply to RodFC. | October 7, 2016 at 3:14 pm

    Yes, the mindless twits who are “social-justice” warriors, ever in need of a cause so they can feel virtuous, protest “The Mikado.”

    Their more griveous sins include lacking of a sense of humor, of humility, and of fun. They can all go and piss off. This isn’t about making fun of the Japanese. It isn’t always about their hurt feelings.

    Disclaimer: Not long ago I was in a production of “The Mikado.” I had the honor, pleasure, and privilege of asking “Why? Who are you who ask this question?”

    Milwaukee in reply to RodFC. | October 7, 2016 at 9:44 pm

    “The Mikado; or, The Town of Titipu” was written by Gilbert and Sullivan. Sullivan wrote the music. He also composed many other works, including the music for “Onward Christian Soldiers.” He was knighted during the reign of Queen Victoria.

    Gilbert wrote the words. He had to wait until 20 years after her death to be knighted. He was politically incorrect before there was such a thing. Since some of his lines are a little pointed, it isn’t hard to see why. For example, in “The Pirates of Penzance, Or, The Slave of Duty: Comic Opera in Two Acts” Frederick asks why the Pirate King doesn’t return to civilization, and we have this exchange.

    Fred I will By the love I have for you I swear it Would that you could render this extermination unnecessary by accompanying me back to civilization.
    King No Frederic it cannot be. I don’t think much of our profession but contrasted with respectability it is comparatively honest. No Frederic I shall live and die a pirate king.

    Song Pirate King
    Oh better far to live and die
    Under the brave black flag I fly
    Than play a sanctimonious part
    With a pirate head and a pirate heart.
    Away to the cheating world go you
    Where pirates all are well to do
    But I ll be true to the song I sing
    And live and die a Pirate King.
    For I am a Pirate King.

    All You are Hurrah for the Pirate King.

    King And it is it is a glorious thing
    To be a Pirate King

    All It is Hurrah for our Pirate King

    King When I sally forth to seek my prey
    I help myself in a royal way
    I sink a few more ships it’s true
    Than a well bred monarch ought to do
    But many a king on a first class throne
    If he wants to call his crown his own
    Must manage somehow to get through
    More dirty work than ever I do
    Though I am a Pirate King

    AllYou are! Hurrah for the Pirate King

    King And it is it is a glorious thing To be a Pirate King

    All It is Hurrah for our Pirate King!

legacyrepublican | October 7, 2016 at 12:57 pm

Proof that Political Correctness will be over when the fat lady sings.

Wonder if they’ll get around to demanding that the dueling banjos scene be cut from Deliverance on the grounds of hillbilly-shaming.

[Class] diversity.

Will they next demand that the cast of Hamilton also be race-appropriate? Of is it OK for non-whites to take the role of a white character, just not the other way around?

Any university that allows operas and musicals to be the victims of student-organized social justice warfare can no longer be considered a serious institution of higher learning.

Which means that there are practically no “serious institution of higher learning” left.

I believe that tolerance of other cultures is an insidious form of cultural appropriation. To ease my conscience and white male guilt, I don’t want to learn about your damn culture, I don’t want to be exposed to your damn culture, and I don’t want to hear you complain about my ignorance of your damn culture.

    jack burns in reply to MTED. | October 7, 2016 at 5:10 pm

    Here, here. If I want to listen to Verdi I’ll listen to Verdi. They can keep their goddamn nose flutes to themselves.

Wait until they do Porgy and Bess next year.

I saw a production of Les Mis in which the role of Madame Thénardier was played by a black woman who performed magnificently.

I guess that the original Madame Thénardier was not black. When Victor Hugo wrote the novel in 18-whatever, how many blacks lived in Paris? Thénardier ends up working as a slaver in the US, so I really doubt he was black!

Should this actress have been denied the role because the character was not black?

    Mannie in reply to Geologist. | October 8, 2016 at 9:40 am

    Likewise, I’ve seen Javert played by a Black man. Cultural appropriation! How heinous. Then again, I can’t imagine seeing Othello played by a White guy.

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