You say “Susan Rice,” any sentient being says “lied about a video being the cause of Benghazi.” So who was the mastermind at Dem Central who decided that Rice was the right person to make the case that, when it comes to foreign affairs, the credibility of an administration’s statements is of paramount importance?

Yet there is Susan Rice’s op-ed in today’s Washington Post, entitled “When the White House twists the truth, we are all less safe.” Excerpts [emphasis added]:

  • when a White House deliberately dissembles and serially contorts the facts, its actions pose a serious risk to America’s global leadership.”
  • “For the United States to mobilize collective action, other nations must accept the validity of our facts.”
  • “when America’s word is frequently found to be false, doubts arise.”
  • “our friends must be able to trust the word of the U.S. president.”
  • “The United States’ words matter. Critical calculations are based on our perceived credibility.”

Care to take a stroll down the memory lane of Rice’s dissembling? Here’s her CNN performance after Benghazi, in which she said: “there was a hateful video that was disseminated on the internet . . . that sparked violence in various parts of the world including violence directed against Western facilities including our embassies and consulates.

As for her line about our friends abroad needing to be able to trust the word of the US president, we’ve got two words for you: “red line.”