After the election, some Democrats and people in media claimed that “fake news” played a role in Trump’s victory. In recent weeks however, the media has made itself look absolutely foolish through a rash of false news reports.

David Rutz of the Washington Free Beacon put together a two minute reel full of examples:

2 Minutes of Mainstream Media Backtracking Really Put ‘Fake News’ Into Perspective

After her surprise presidential election loss to Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton warned about the scourge of fake news that gripped social media during the campaign.

In a Dec. 8 speech, Clinton said an “epidemic” of fake news–a catch-all term for misleading, inaccurate, or outright false stories under the guise of news–can have “real-world consequences.”

Indeed, it still does.

Watch the video below:

Daniel Payne of The Federalist has compiled a list of examples:

16 Fake News Stories Reporters Have Run Since Trump Won

Since at least Donald Trump’s election, our media have been in the grip of an astonishing, self-inflicted crisis. Despite Trump’s constant railing against the American press, there is no greater enemy of the American media than the American media. They did this to themselves.

We are in the midst of an epidemic of fake news. There is no better word to describe it than “epidemic,” insofar as it fits the epidemiological model from the Centers for Disease Control: this phenomenon occurs when “an agent and susceptible hosts are present in adequate numbers, and the agent can be effectively conveyed from a source to the susceptible hosts.”…

Early November: Spike in Transgender Suicide Rates

After Trump’s electoral victory on November 8, rumors began circulating that multiple transgender teenagers had killed themselves in response to the election results. There was no basis to these rumors. Nobody was able to confirm them at the time, and nobody has been able to confirm in the three months since Trump was elected.

Nevertheless, the claim spread far and wide: Guardian writer and editor-at-large of Out Zach Stafford tweeted the rumor, which was retweeted more than 13,000 times before he deleted it. He later posted a tweet explaining why he deleted his original viral tweet; his explanatory tweet was shared a total of seven times. Meanwhile, PinkNews writer Dominic Preston wrote a report on the rumors, which garnered more than 12,000 shares on Facebook.

That’s just one example. See the rest here.

The media’s problem is that they seem more interested in taking down Trump than they are in reporting the facts. In the process, they just keep damaging their already tarnished credibility.

Featured image via YouTube.