French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo has announced plans to release a German edition. Terrorists targeted the magazine in January 2015 after it published cartoons of Mohammed, killing twelve people:

The weekly newspaper will launch in Germany on December 1 with an initial print run of 200,000 issues, although it said it does not know how many edition it will print thereafter.

The first issues will mostly comprise of texts and caricatures translated from the original French edition. However, in time editors intend to also create original German content.

It will be the first time “Charlie Hebdo” has founded an edition for a foreign audience. The publishers saw Germany as the market that expressed the keenest interest in having its own edition. It also provides part of its content in English on its website. A spokeswoman said that the caricaturists in particular encountered a notable demand for the newspaper on their visits to Germany.

However, “Charlie Hebdo” has ruled out opening an office in Germany. Rather, teams of German-speaking reporters and translators will work on the newspaper remotely or from the “Charlie Hebdo” office in Paris.

It will cost 4 euros (about $4.20) at newspaper stalls, where it will sell alongside competing German satirical magazines such as “Titanic” and “Eulenspiegel.”