The State Department caused waves earlier today when it announced it would release the first batch of emails from Hillary Clinton that the FBI discovered AFTER the agents finished their investigation. Turns out its a bunch of almost nothing.

On its website, the State Department published 75 emails consisting of 270 pages. The majority belong to previously published email chains, but the new additions are from Hillary asking her aides to print the chains.

Courts ordered the State Department to release the documents in four stages, today being the first day:

One judge has ordered State to process 350 pages of Clinton’s emails for release every other week through the election. Other judges have ordered an additional batch of 1,850 pages to be processed for release on Nov. 3, five days before the election.

The actual number of pages disclosed is likely to be substantially smaller than those figures would suggest because State can count toward the total entirely duplicative messages as well as those referred to other agencies for review.

“The order was to process — to work through 350 [pages,] which we did,” Kirby said.

The pace of release is also substantially slower than when State was releasing emails Clinton provided directly to her former agency, with monthly releases of as many as 7,000 pages of messages.

The State Department insisted it cannot work that fast “because they are devoting resources to other Clinton-related requests with court-imposed deadlines before the election.” However, those who have asked for documents through the Freedom of Information Act accuse the department of allowing “its FOIA-related staffing to slump, reducing its capacity in the months leading up to the election.”

Coincidence? Probably not.

This document dump comes a day after the RNC gave The Wall Street Journal a few documents that shows the White House worked with Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign over her private email server when she served as secretary of state:

Their discussion included a request from the White House communications director to her counterpart at the State Department to see if it was possible to arrange for Secretary of State John Kerry to avoid questions during media appearances about Mrs. Clinton’s email arrangement.

In another instance, a top State Department official assured an attorney for Mrs. Clinton that, contrary to media reports, a department official hadn’t told Congress that Mrs. Clinton erred in using a private email account.

Hillary’s email scandal led to a year long FBI investigation, which ended in July. Director James Comey shocked everyone when he announced he will not recommend the DOJ press charges despite finding Hillary and her staff were careless with sensitive information.