Tuesday reports surfaced that Paris Police were advising against lighting Hanukkah candles in public places due to security concerns.

The Times of Israel reported:

Miri Michaeli, Europe correspondent for Israel’s Channel 10 news, tweets a troubling report from Paris.

The tweet reads, in Hebrew: “Chabad: Paris police order [us] to cancel most of our public [Hanukkah] candlelighting in the city, in light of the terror attack and the fear of additional attacks. Efforts [are underway] to approve a candlelighting at the foot of the Eiffel [Tower].”

Later (and after the headline spread internet-wide) the Times of Israel posted an update saying the original report had been retracted:

Tuesday claim that public menorah lightnings for Hanukkah in Paris were being canceled over security fears has been retracted by the Israeli journalist who originally made the claim.

The public menorah lighting at the base of the Eiffel Tower on the first night of Hanukkah Sunday will go ahead as planned, according to Miri Michaeli, who had earlier reported that police were shutting down the displays.

She says a discussion will be held Wednesday over other displays.

The large menorah at the Eiffel tower, set up by the Chabad movement, is an annual tradition that regularly brings out thousands of Jews to celebrate the Festival of Lights in the City of Lights.

Climate change might have sparked radical Islamic terrorist attacks, but it doesn’t have the clout to cancel Hanukkah. At least there’s that.

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