The story of Hillary Clinton’s email server is already getting lost in spin and talking points. It’s easy to forget the fundamental fact at the center of the issue. Hilary Clinton violated the law.

Bill Whittle gets right to the heart of it in the new edition of Firewall and frankly calls it criminal.

Via Truth Revolt:

Hillary Rodham Clinton decided to conduct, for four years, the office of Secretary of State using her own private email server. Because these emails were not transacted and recorded through the official State Department servers, Mrs. Clinton “willfully concealed and removed” these critical documents from the records and archives of the United States Government. You can further argue that by electing to not have these records placed onto government servers – which are secure, routinely backed up, and most importantly subject to Freedom Of Information Act requests, that she has, by any reasonable interpretation, “mutilated, obliterated and destroyed” these essential records, which belong not to Hillary Rodham Clinton but rather to the Secretary of State of the United States of America, and her employers, the people of that nation.

The penalty for this is a fine or up to three years imprisonment, or both. That’s paragraph (a) of the law.

Watch it all below:

Judge Andrew Napolitano of FOX News has been outspoken about the legal aspects of this from the beginning. He recently wrote:

Hillary Clinton: What if former secretary of state will never respect our laws?

What if Hillary Clinton’s emails were hacked by foreign agents when she was the secretary of state? What if persons claiming to have done so are boasting about their alleged feats on Internet websites and in chat rooms traditionally associated with illegal or undercover activities? What if this is the sore underbelly of an arrogant and lawless secretary of state who used her power to exempt herself from laws that govern executive branch employees and didn’t care about national security?

What if the law required Clinton to swear under oath on her first day as secretary of state that she would comply with all laws governing the use of federal records? What if the principal governing law — the Federal Records Act of 1950 — makes it clear that when you work for the feds all the records you receive and generate belong to the government and you cannot lawfully conceal them from the government?

Democrats and the media can’t spin the law.

Featured image via YouTube.