The Supreme Court today refused to accept for review a case challenging the Wisconsin Voter I.D. law.

The case, Frank v. Walker, was on a long list of cases as to which petitions for certiorari were denied without explanation.

Supreme Court Wisconsin Voter ID Cert Denied

In early October, 2014, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the Voter I.D. law, as we reported at the time:

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Wisconsin’s new voter ID laws are constitutional, meaning that those heading to the polls in November will need to show ID before casting a vote….

Last month, the same panel of the 7th Circuit issued a short Order vacating the district court injunction staying enforcement of the law, and instead held that the voter ID laws would indeed be in effect for this November’s election. The court indicated that a full decision on the merits would be forthcoming.

Progressive activists in Wisconsin and across the country had a meltdown following the ruling

And they are not taking it well this time, either, via HuffPo:

“The Supreme Court’s decision is a huge step backward for our democracy,” Advancement Project Co-Director Penda D. Hair said in a statement Monday. “The 300,000 registered Wisconsin voters who lack the limited forms of photo ID needed to vote in Wisconsin — disproportionately African Americans and Latinos — deserve to have their voices heard in our political process. The values enshrined in our Constitution, and protected in the Voting Rights Act, are undermined when burdensome laws like photo ID requirements make the ballot box inaccessible to any eligible voters. Our elections should always be free, fair and accessible to all citizens. Under Wisconsin’s restrictive photo ID law, they simply are not.”

Who wins here?

In addition to voters who now can have more trust in the integrity of the system, the winner is Scott Walker, who once again has defeated the opposition against all odds.