We recently posted a story on changing the direction of political dialog in this country, which asked the following question:

How do we get a foothold for conservative ideas in the public schools, and how do we expand that foothold over time?

An Idaho lawmaker may be providing the answer to that question:

State Sen. John Goedde introduced legislation on Tuesday that would require Idaho secondary students to read and pass an examination on the iconic 1957 novel touted by conservatives like Rep. Paul Ryan and Rush Limbaugh.

The lawmaker, though, says the bill is meant more as a statement than an actual proposed policy. Goedde, in a statement to FoxNews.com, said media outlets have thus far “totally missed the point” of the bill — he described the bill as a protest to a state Board of Education decision to roll back online class requirements.

“Traditionally in Idaho, the State Board of Education sets graduation requirements in rule,” Goedde wrote in an email Thursday. “They recently repealed a rule dealing with online class requirements and failed to move another rule forward dealing with administrators demonstrating proficiency in evaluating teachers. I felt both were important and wanted to remind them that the legislature could also set graduation standards.”

While it may be more of a protest statement, the approach is one that has merit. “Atlas Shrugged” is one of the touchstones for many involved in conservative citizen activism, such as Left Coast Rebel’s Les Carpenter.

Ayn Rand, the 20th century author, playwright, philosopher, and advocate for individualism, laissez faire capitalism, and a true life sustaining value system is now more relevant than ever.

In this time of unrestrained budget deficits and a steadily rising national debt, burdensome and damaging regulatory controls, an anti business and anti growth mentality, crony capitalism and government subsidies for businesses, a rising tide of altruism, unjustified and unethical military interventions into sovereign states that pose no threat to our national security… America needs more than ever a philosophy and ethics to guide her.

And it’s 180 degrees different than the course being taken in California, which is no longer making it a requirement for students to take algebra. Furthermore, it seems other states may also be adopting this policy.

will no longer require eighth-graders to take algebra — a move that is line with the Common Core standards being adopted by most states, but that may leave students unprepared for college.

With national standards demanding less of students, state and local systems may find Goedde’s proposed legislation an example to follow.

 
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