Don’t believe the spin that Elizabeth Warren’s claims about being Native American don’t matter.  Or that she simply made a mistake in how she handled it.

This headline from U.S. News demonstrates how it is being played:

Warren Gaffes on Native American Roots Enflame Senate Race in Massachusetts

There was no gaffe as in mistake; there was a deliberate campaign of deception and evasion.

There also was not gaffe even in the Washington sense, which is when a politician tells the truth.

Warren’s statements have been anti-gaffes, not gaffes.

The text of the U.S. News article shows that the anti-gaffes matter in the election:

Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown and his Democratic challenger  Elizabeth Warren are still deadlocked in recent polls, but their  campaigns may both be facing a critical turning point.

Andrew Smith, the pollster who conducted a recent Boston Globe  poll showing Brown with 39 percent support to Warren’s 37 percent, says  the Native American issue–Warren supposedly reaping professional  benefits from her claims of mixed blood–is likely more significant than  his poll seems to indicate.

According to the survey, nearly  3 in 4 voters said the controversy would not impact their vote. But of  the Democrats who say they are voting for Brown now, 43 percent said the  Native American issue makes them less likely to vote for Warren and 48  percent of the independents say the same, he says.

“If you  throw out the Republicans who were going to vote for Brown anyway and  the hardcore Democrats who were going to vote for Warren anyway, you  start to look at the 5 percent that’s going to make a difference in this  race–it’s really close,” Smith says. “It’s having an impact there.”

It matters.  Don’t let them tell you otherwise.