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Ruptured Water Coil Damages U. Arkansas-Little Rock’s Basketball Court

Ruptured Water Coil Damages U. Arkansas-Little Rock’s Basketball Court

“Joe Foley Court was covered in water, so the school had no choice but to rip up the hardwood to let it dry.”

You can see photos below. This was obviously pretty bad. The floor of the court is mostly torn up.

FOX News reports:

University of Arkansas at Little Rock’s basketball court severely damaged from freezing temperatures

Freezing temperatures in Little Rock caused a rupture to a water coil in the University of Arkansas at Little Rock’s Jack Stephens Center, causing severe damage to the court.

Joe Foley Court was covered in water, so the school had no choice but to rip up the hardwood to let it dry.

The men’s and women’s basketball teams have had their games on Thursday postponed and relocated, and it’s unknown if the court is salvageable for the season.

“I’m very appreciative of Simmons Bank Arena for their willingness to work with us on such short notice, especially over a holiday weekend,” Director of Athletics George Lee said in a statement. “This situation has posed a unique challenge and I’m grateful for their flexibility and assistance to help us keep our OVC opening doubleheader in central Arkansas.”

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Comments

Anyone know what a “water coil” in this instance is?

A water coil could be the polyethylene tubing buried in the concrete by looping the ends back and forth. Warm/hot water is pumped through the tubing to provide heating for the court and maybe the arena. This type of heating usually is heated by geothermal or gas for efficiency, especially if it is zone oriented. Many houses use this due to its efficiency. A power outage may result in freezing in the winter if not backed up by a secondary heat source. I have had it in my home and love it’s a soft heat and efficient. No blowing air either.

    The Gentle Grizzly in reply to jrcowboy49. | December 30, 2022 at 7:05 pm

    I’d love a house so heated! I have a $#&%*@ heat pump. Below certain temps it keeps up but not with a HEAT heat. it is more a semi-warm draft.

Not only was it cold down here, the wind was in the upper teens with gusts in the 20’s. Things that didn’t literally freeze may have hit their lower operating limit, like switches, thermostats and fans in attic-mounted furnaces.

A friend of mine in Kendall Park, NJ has that kind of heating in his modest house. I had never heard of it before and have never know anyone else to have it in the intervening 40 years. It makes sense to heat the entire floor, as heat rises and passes by the furniture and occupant as it rises. Just don’t turn off the thermostat in the middle of a cold snap (but that does for baseboard heating as well. We know it but the younger folks sometimes find out the hard way.