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Princeton University Offering a Course on ‘Black and Queer’ BDSM

Princeton University Offering a Course on ‘Black and Queer’ BDSM

“Black Queer BDSM material culture resists contextualization in relationship to biographical narratives because of the underground elements of the community”

BDSM is short for bondage and sado-maschochism. This seems like a rather niche topic for a course.

The College Fix reports:

Princeton to offer course on ‘Black + Queer’ bondage

Princeton University will host a course this spring on “Black + Queer” bondage and sado-maschochism, drawing concern from some students who argue the class is a thinly veiled attempt to celebrate and venerate the BDSM culture.

The Ivy League course, “Black + Queer in Leather: Black Leather/BDSM Material Culture,” explores “Black Queer BDSM communities,” according to the course catalog description.

“Black Queer BDSM material culture resists contextualization in relationship to biographical narratives because of the underground elements of the community,” according to an alternate description on the Princeton Lewis Center for the Arts website, which added it will have “a significant research focus on finding and presenting new materials.”

The reading list includes “Sensational Flesh: Race, Power, and Masochism” by Amber Jamilla Musser, “The Color of Kink: Black Women, BDSM, and Pornography” by Ariane Cruz, “The Black Body In Ecstasy: Reading Race, Reading Pornography,” by Jennifer Nash, and “A Taste for Brown Sugar: Black Women in Pornography” by Mireille Miller-Young.

Miller-Young is an associate professor of feminist studies at UC Santa Barbara whose area of focus is black studies, pornography and sex-work. She got in a physical altercation with a pro-life teenager in campus in 2014 after she was “triggered” by pro-life demonstrators’ signs. She was sentenced to to community service, anger-management classes, and $493 in restitution to the teen she assaulted, The College Fix reported at the time.

Princeton’s “Black + Queer” class is cross-listed with the Program in Visual Arts, the African American Studies department, and the Gender and Sexuality Studies department. Tiona McClodden, a 2021-23 Arts Fellow with Princeton’s Lewis Center for the Arts, is listed as its instructor.

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Comments

In order for this course to be approved by higher-ups, and make it into the course catalog without objections from students, parents, alumni … think about the level of hubris. Utter, complete , haughty arrogance.

Do you realize how much money it costs to attend Princeton?

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At a non-dysfunctional institution, a couple of senior faculty or senior administrators would have gotten together and made this class go away … before it became the public embarrassment that it is.

If Princeton offered a course in The Cross-Cultural Differences Between Picking One’s Friends versus The Picking of One’s Nose … it would not make such a course worth the time or money.

If this is what Princeton does in public, just imagine what they do behind closed doors.

Dolce Far Niente | November 14, 2022 at 12:54 pm

The march of degeneracy through our institutions is proceeding at a satisfyingly brisk pace.

Vice is both satisfying and lucrative to those who have fully embraced Satan’s plan.

Of course they are.
They’re teaching Progressivism, and Hedonism is one of the prime pillars of Progressivism, along with group identity (racism).

“Campus Health Service… OMG, what happened to you?”
“It was Professor Shorterm Memoryloss… she never remembers her students’ safewords!”
“Shut up, you ableist!

The Gentle Grizzly | November 15, 2022 at 1:03 pm

Black BDSM… h’mmm. Will someone do up a hip hop arrangement of Tom Lehrer’s Masochism Tango?

I will always defend academic freedom. However, to me the question is what is the impact of listing this course on a student’s college transcript? Does Princeton deliver the transcript to prospective employers and graduate schools in a brown paper bag?

Suppose the student, years later, is being vetting to serve on the US Supreme Court. Will he claim that he took the course but did not “inhale” its content?

I can understand the negative inferences drawn against any person who elects to enroll in such a course.