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Monkeypox Outbreak Seemingly Slows as Cases Fall in Major Cities

Monkeypox Outbreak Seemingly Slows as Cases Fall in Major Cities

Survey shows gay men are now cutting back on sexual activity to avoid the virus.

There appears to be some good news related to the monkeypox outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced that case numbers have fallen in several major cities.

“We’re watching this with cautious optimism, and really hopeful that many of our harm-reduction messages and our vaccines are getting out there and working,” CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky told reporters Friday during an update on the monkeypox outbreak.

Although monkeypox cases are still increasing nationally, the speed of the outbreak appears to be slowing, Walensky said. The U.S. has reported nearly 17,000 monkeypox cases since May, more than any other country in the world, according to CDC data.

In New York City, which has reported more infections than any other jurisdiction, new monkeypox cases have dropped from more than 70 per day on average to nine as of Thursday, according to data from the city health department.

…We’re not seeing the potentially exponential growth that we were seeing early on so that is reassuring,” said Dr. Allison Arwady, Chicago’s public health commissioner, during a Facebook live event earlier this week. “Too early to say things look really good, but definitely some signs of slowing of cases.”

This development may result from accepting science and data over narratives by the impacted population. A recent survey among American gay and bisexual men in early August found that about half cut down on sexual activity in response to the global monkeypox outbreak.

The survey, conducted online Aug. 5-15, was led by Kevin Delaney, of the Monkeypox Emergency Response Team at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“These findings suggest that men who have sex with men are already taking actions to protect their sexual health and making decisions to reduce risk to themselves and their partners,” Delaney’s team reported.

The timing of the survey — and its finding that America’s gay male community reacted swiftly to the monkeypox threat — coincides with a recent global decline in monkeypox cases.

According to World Health Organization data released Thursday, the number of monkeypox cases around the world dropped by 21% over the prior week.

According to the CDC, nearly 17,000 cases of the viral illness have been reported in the United States. The vast majority of cases are occurring among gay and bisexual men.

I want to think my posts focusing on the relative risks of infection based on modes of transmission helped. This includes my last piece, which described the consequences of severe infection.

Unfortunately, pediatric cases are occurring…including one involving an infant under 1.

Across the country, at least 18 children in 10 states have now tested positive for monkeypox, according to state and local health officials, and little is known about most of these cases, due to concerns over patient privacy.

One of these cases has been identified in King County, Washington, where local officials recently confirmed that an infant in their community had tested positive for the monkeypox virus.

The child has been hospitalized and receiving treatment for the virus in recent days after being exposed to monkeypox through an infected family member, officials said. The child did not become infected in a school, child care, or other public setting.

Officials from Seattle Children’s Hospital confirmed to ABC News that their teams are currently caring for the infected baby, who is under the age of 1.

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Comments

How did the infant contract monkeypox?
That is a question begging for an answer.

It will surge again. Viruses evolve to become more transmissible.

There will be more Pride parades and this number will pop again.

If one can stop his penis from entering his buddy’s butt the risk is minimal. So how bout 21 days of stop the spread to stop the spread?

Oh look it’s working….

    Valerie in reply to Gandalfe. | August 29, 2022 at 10:37 am

    ….and without any mandates. Too bad so many world governments trust the judgment of gay men more than other kinds of people.

Another case of ‘government experts’ and media providing the weirdest solutions to obvious issues while ordinary people look at the issue and say “Why don’t we just do X?” Then when X gets to be the most common activity and the problem starts to go away, the government experts are right there to take credit with their ‘solution’ and accept awards and bonuses despite having hindered the actual fix to the problem.

Wow, it’s almost like there is a good reason for society to stigmatize certain behaviors.

In other news from the world of business, shares of Trojan have firmed up considerably.
.

Let’s not forget that these men also had to overcome “the stigma” too. I was told by the public health overlords that “the stigma” was the real problem.

Honestly, I think they can thank non-traditional media sources for calling CDC and other “Public Health Authorities” on their being more concerned on stigmatization than health. It likely helped a lot of the highly polyamorous gay male population take some real steps, despite the stupid pearl clutching of people who sacrifice health care for virtue signalling.

There are only so many people that engage in homosexual orgies on a scale necessary to contract Monkeypox.

Contrary to the Lefties MYTH, no, we’re not “all gay”.

Only a few % are, and most of them keep their partner count per week at under a dozen.