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University System of Maryland’s Board of Regents Approves Removal of SAT/ACT Requirements

University System of Maryland’s Board of Regents Approves Removal of SAT/ACT Requirements

“[h]storically, standardized test scores have been a barrier for many students, with some built-in biases”

When states lower their admissions standards, it should not be viewed as a good thing. It’s a red flag.

Campus Reform reports:

Another university removes SAT/ACT requirements

The University System of Maryland (USM) has approved a proposal to no longer require students to submit their SAT/ACT test scores as part of the college application process.

USM’s Board of Regents approved the proposal earlier this summer. As a result, the twelve individual schools within the system can maintain the SAT/ACT requirement but are under no obligation to do so.

“ACT/SAT is often a barrier to admission and GPA is a strong (and often stronger) indicator of student success,” the proposal reads.

USM Media Relations and Web Officer Mike Lurie told Campus Reform that the new policy is based on students’ experiences during COVID-19.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, SAT and ACT testing was not available to high school students preparing to apply for college admission,” Lurie said.

He added that “[h]storically, standardized test scores have been a barrier for many students, with some built-in biases that have impacted under-represented minorities and first-generation college applicants.”

Not everyone agrees with the move, however.

The proposal records board member Andy Smarick arguing that removing these requirements will “take away a long-used, objective measure that is free of human bias.”

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Comments

The Gentle Grizzly | July 17, 2022 at 1:36 pm

The bias being you need the intelligence, experience, and cultural background to pass the test.

Too bad.

    MIT made ACT/SAT test optional 2020-2022. They reinstated it for 2023. They found that without the scores the selection process for those who would succeed at MIT was impaired.

      coyote in reply to kyrrat. | July 18, 2022 at 9:27 am

      We sure did. And what’s more, the admissions department found that ~not~ using standardized test scores negatively impacted the same groups, especially first generation collegians and minorities.

      Granted, MIT self-describes itself—correctly, I might add—as “math-heavy.” But at least so far, it still relies heavily on the use of logic and reason. And SAT/ACTs still look at that, too.

Their value is that they are biased against stupid people.

Albigensian | July 17, 2022 at 5:19 pm

“standardized test scores have been a barrier for many students.”

And calculus too! Not to mention chemistry, physics, or other math. Even a serious exploration of history or literature might be a “barrier,” if it’s taught with some rigor.

Get rid of it all! Topple all the barriers!!

Better yet, why not just hand out degrees to anyone who requests one?

College acceptances are being driven to the level of “trophies for everyone.”

Next: lowering grade standards because not everyone (admitted without academic standards) can handle actual college level courses.

Unless they are those quasi majors, like (X)-studies etc.

“ACT/SAT is often a barrier to admission and GPA is a strong (and often stronger) indicator of student success,” the proposal reads.”

Translation: We’re removing the objective standards so that we can rely on inflated and/or affirmative high-school grades. Otherwise, we’ll have NO students.

These kids have been passed along every step of the way. Flunked 1st grade but the teacher didn’t want to deal with them again, So the teacher passed them into 2nd grade. Repeat every year and they graduate high school completely incapable of doing the work. Now they can get postdoctoral degrees and still won’t know anything, other than how entitled they are and how dumb the ‘authorities’ are

“standardized test scores have been a barrier for many students.”

Yes, and money is a barrier to many people who want to buy Maseratis. Lowering the bar is an statement that your school isn’t particularly good.

Really good news for the Baltimore Public High Schools. That means the functional illiterate who graduates with a ..6 GPA can now attend college at Maryland

    Dimsdale in reply to dr. frank. | July 18, 2022 at 12:54 pm

    I’d laugh if I wasn’t weeping for the future of this country.

    The Fifth Columnists of the left are working hard to destroy this country.