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Report: COVID Shutdowns Changed High School Students’ Health and Behavior

Report: COVID Shutdowns Changed High School Students’ Health and Behavior

It had nothing to do with the pandemic. It has everything to do with shutdowns, making people scared, and keeping kids out of school.

America will observe the side effects of shutting down the country and schools for a long time in the name of COVID.

Reports have come out from almost the beginning showing the shutdowns and lack of in-person school caused mental health and behavioral problems in children.

Here’s another one from the CDC. Will the CDC admit it was wrong and apologize for ruining so many lives?

Debra Houry, CDC acting principal deputy director, said: “These data echo a cry for help. The COVID-19 pandemic has created traumatic stressors that have the potential to further erode students’ mental wellbeing.”

Ma’am, the pandemic had nothing to do with it. It’s all about shutdowns, closing schools, making people scared of each other, and even making people scared to leave their houses.

The Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey (ABES), taken between January – July 2021, found a “mental health crisis” among adolescents:

  • More than 1 in 3 high school students experienced poor mental health during the pandemic and nearly half of students felt persistently sad or hopeless.
  • Female students and those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, other or questioning (LGBQ) are experiencing disproportionate levels of poor mental health and suicide-related behaviors. For example, in 2021, 12% of female students, more than 25% of LGB students, and 17% of other or questioning students attempted suicide during the past year compared to 5% of their male peers and 5% of their heterosexual peers, respectively.

School is not only for education. It’s for mingling and learning your capacities in a social environment.

Unfortunately, it’s also an escape for some who suffer abuse at home or don’t have enough food at home:

  • The range of impacts on youth’s daily lives was broad – including difficulties, family economic impacts, hunger, and abuse in the home.
  • More than half of students experienced emotional abuse in the home and more than 10% reported physical abuse in the home.
  • Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were far more likely to report physical abuse, with 20% reporting that they had been physically abused by a parent or other adult in their home, compared to 10% of heterosexual students.
  • Black students were most likely to report hunger, with nearly a third reporting that there was not enough food in their home during the pandemic.

But then the CDC tried to deflect the blame to schools. Some schools deserve it (looking at you, Chicago!) but remember a lot of them went by CDC guidance: “More must be done to ensure that schools provide a safe and supportive where all students feel connected to people who care, so that all students can fully benefit from the protections connectedness provides.”

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Comments

2smartforlibs | April 1, 2022 at 5:34 pm

Wasn’t the idea to make them more subservient?

The survey responses reported in the box seem credible, but the text of the article recites levels of attempted suicide that would have noticeably overwhelmed hospital emergency rooms and mental health facilities. If these reflect self-reporting by surveyed teens, they hardly seem reliable. I certainly agree that the public health and education bureaucracies did far more damage to our youth than did the virus.

    healthguyfsu in reply to jakebizlaw. | April 1, 2022 at 6:04 pm

    I dont have a qualm with you about questioning veracity of the data but many attemptees do not got to the hospital.

    Most of the people that commit do not have the highest intellect, dont have a lot of money, and are often on mind altering substances leading to quite a few “failed” attempts and spontaneous recovery.

      jakebizlaw in reply to healthguyfsu. | April 1, 2022 at 6:59 pm

      I appreciate your experienced p.o.v. But 1 of 8 of all female adolescents attempted suicide during the course of 1 year? If true, that calls for a major reset. Generally, it seems our approach to children’s mental health is making them less resilient.

        henrybowman in reply to jakebizlaw. | April 2, 2022 at 5:37 pm

        Yeah, that can’t possibly be true, or our supply of crazy white chicks would be demonstrably below what it clearly is.

    Dathurtz in reply to jakebizlaw. | April 1, 2022 at 6:57 pm

    Anecdotally,I have had six of my students attempt suicide in eleven years. Four of those were last year. I feel like there is a big change that has occurred, but I have no idea what the real, overall data says.

Psaki reveals COVID shut down even hurt the president. He now needs cue cards to remember to sniff little girls.

henrybowman | April 1, 2022 at 6:58 pm

“Unfortunately, it’s also an escape for some who suffer abuse at home or don’t have enough food at home”

You know, that’s not actually what schools are for, that’s just undesirable mission creep.

The secondary and tertiary impacts of Covid were a result of the decisions made by leadership in response to Covid.
They chose to lockdown, mask mandate, demand vaccination.

It is completely disingenuous for these same leaders to attempt to blame a virus for their decisions. Every employee who was fired, retired early or quit instead of being forcibly vaccinated is one less to carry the economic load; pilots, nurses, law enforcement are but a few examples. An entire cohort of students have been set back and that cohort will literally never reach the promise of their potential. Tens of thousands of small businesses have gone under as crony capitalist insiders were granted exemptions from politicians all too eager to reward friends and punish enemies. We must not allow a repetition.

Take a knee to the cargo cult by choice, Choice, or force.

#FJB <-- Disco Stu_ | April 2, 2022 at 7:43 am

I’m sure we’re all comforted knowing there’s a CDC Acting Principal Deputy Director just being there to watch over our healthy lives.