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Washington University in St. Louis Holding Event on ‘Professionalism as a Racist Construct’

Washington University in St. Louis Holding Event on ‘Professionalism as a Racist Construct’

“The term ‘professionalism’ has at times been used to silence and marginalize people of color”

This has nothing to do with the pursuit of scholarship. It’s just left-wing, race obsessed junk.

FOX News reports:

Washington University in St. Louis: ‘Professionalism’ is racist

An event at Washington University in St. Louis is asking students one question: “Is Professionalism a Racist Construct?”

The event is being held virtually through the university on Feb. 1, but states that the term professionalism, at times, “has at times been used to silence and marginalize people of color.”

“The term ‘professionalism’ has at times been used to silence and marginalize people of color, when attributes of appearance, language or interactions that have nothing to do with job knowledge or constructive collegial relationships are labeled as ‘unprofessional,'” the event description states.

In this context, the event description states, professionalism upholds white supremacy.

“In this context, so-called professionalism is coded language, a construct that upholds institutional racist policies and excluding practices,” the description states.

According to the description, the event will focus on “dismantling white supremacy and privilege in varied contexts while upholding social justice and advancing effective workplaces in which all contributors can bring their full selves to the job site.”

In September, Washington University in St. Louis received national attention after a student senator placed American flags from a 9/11 display on campus into trash bags.

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Comments

Translation: The person who developed this indoctrination was once criticized for unprofessional conduct, therefore the perception of professionalism must be at fault.

The Gentle Grizzly | January 24, 2022 at 2:31 pm

Maybe some of you and the education business know the answer to this one; I certainly don’t. The question is: do universities in other parts of the world have the sort of nonsense?

    henrybowman in reply to The Gentle Grizzly. | January 24, 2022 at 7:01 pm

    Well, for example, Katherine Gibbs Professional Secretarial School (a venerable Providence institution, which spread to Boston and NYC) had classes on this subject practically every day. However I suspect the advice given to Washington U students will look nothing like what those young ladies received.

    She cultivated an elite image, teaching not only typing and stenography, but English, speech and manners. She strictly enforced the dress code [which included white gloves]… Gibbs girls were taught to be punctual and organized. Standards for mailable letters were uncompromising: there couldn’t be a single mistake. The school helped the students find jobs. Employers would say, “Oh, a Katie Gibbs girl… send her right over.”

    Somewhat old fashioned, when compared to today’s, “Hire me, cracker, or I’ll sue your ass.”

    As a newlywed with Gibbs credentials, the Mrs. enjoyed the “send her right over” experience continually, even after we relocated to the Beltway area.

    Few here will be surprised to learn that the Gibbs schools closed their doors permanently in 2011.

      The Gentle Grizzly in reply to henrybowman. | January 25, 2022 at 3:48 am

      I think the school sounds admirable. It’s closing up its doors, is, something I believe is related to the evolution and business communication. I think the days of Susie take a letter we’re gone. Dale virtually everything is done by telephone or email.

      The Gentle Grizzly in reply to henrybowman. | January 25, 2022 at 3:49 am

      I think the school sounds admirable. It’s closing up its doors, is, something I believe is related to the evolution and business communication. I think the days of Susie take a letter we’re gone. Dale virtually everything is done by telephone or email.

      One rule that I enforced for my three workers was that their emails would look every bit is good as a good business letter. Little one in two sentence in our office communications were fine. But, anything that went to a customer had to be within reason on grammar, and always accurate and spelling.

      I also emphasize the paragraphs are your friend.

Well, I dunno. There’s a lot of meat to chew on that bone.

I assume they’re talking about the “unfairness” of the hiring boss picking the dude who shows up in a suit, over the dude who shows up in untied kicks and a FUCK THA POLEECE t-shirt, or the dude whose earlobes remind the boss of his coffee mug.

Because, you know, punctuality and appearance are part of “white culture,” and it’s unfair for a boss to hire that way, especially when he’s hiring someone who has to show up at 8 AM every day and sit behind the reception desk.

It would be instructive to hear what this course has to say about behaviors and appearances that have been criticized as unprofessional… and then we can make up our minds about whether they are valid in the real world, and whether the course proceeds to give the right advice, or just more race-pandering bullshit.

I have been a guest lecturer in medicine at several universities in Europe, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Foreign standards for professional conduct are even more stringent than the United States—political matters, personal opinions peripheral to the topic(s) being discussed or presented and small talk—are all strictly off limits. I didn’t find those restrictions unloveable at all, but quite the opposite. I don’t wish to engage in self-reflection to students, but present the material and answer student questions related to it. Neither do I really want to engage in callow discussions of philosophies with students and other faculty that aren’t important to the topic at hand. I don’t give a damn if anyone considers that to be boring, but frankly I was there to discuss medicine—not be an act in a floorshow or to engage in a debating club.

Antifundamentalist | January 24, 2022 at 10:20 pm

Good manners are a social construct that allows human being to live and work together productively and relatively peacefully. There are limits to what we can do in public. Basically, We pretend to respect one another so that we don’t have to kill each other. Labelling professionalism as racist is just another tool to create chaos in society so that the People waiting in the wings can take over.

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