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1619 Project’s Nikole Hannah-Jones: “I don’t really understand this idea that parents should decide what’s being taught”

1619 Project’s Nikole Hannah-Jones: “I don’t really understand this idea that parents should decide what’s being taught”

Saying the quiet part out loud.

This position isn’t working out too well for Democrats so far. Let a thousand Glenn Youngkins bloom.

FOX News reports:

NY Times’ Nikole Hannah-Jones says she ‘doesn’t understand’ why parents should have say in kids’ education

New York Times reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones echoed failed 2021 gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe’s comments on a parent’s role in education.

NBC’s “Meet the Press” dove into the topic of “Schools, America, and Race” on Sunday, using Hannah-Jones’ “1619 Project” as a subject. The 1619 Project, as well as critical race theory, have come under controversy for appearing to influence school curriculum…

Hannah-Jones then argued that it shouldn’t be left to lawmakers or parents to decide what can be taught in schools.

“So, I think we should frame that question properly,” she continued. “And I don’t really understand this idea that parents should decide what’s being taught. I’m not a professional educator. I don’t have a degree in social studies or science we send our children to school because we want them to be taught by people who have expertise in the subject area. And that is not my job.”

Here’s the video:

Featured image via Twitter video.

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Comments

She doesn’t have a degree in history either but that didn’t stop her from writing about it. Funny how she forgot to mention that bit.

    Dimsdale in reply to irv. | December 28, 2021 at 8:58 pm

    According to “BlackPast.org”, “she attended the University of Notre Dame and earned her BA in history and African American studies in 1998. Hannah then received a Roy H. Park Fellowship from the University of North Carolina Hussman School of Journalism and Media, and graduated with her master’s in journalism in 2003.”

    So she has a bachelors in history tainted with black studies. Then, apparently, it took her FIVE years to get a Masters in jounalism. For reference, in the hard sciences, one can earn a Masters in two years.

    “And I don’t really understand this idea that parents should decide what’s being taught. I’m not a professional educator. I don’t have a degree in social studies or science we send our children to school because we want them to be taught by people who have expertise in the subject area. And that is not my job.”

    Nor is it your job to criticize parents who, after seeing what academia has turned into, courtesy of the Covid panic of 2020-21, decided that perhaps teachers had more interested in indoctrinating our children into their socialist, racist screed than actually teaching useful subjects.

    Clown hair is not a qualifier for superceding a parent’s interest in what their child is being taught.

Raggedy Ann doesn’t seem to understand much.

“I’m not a professional educator.”, is very obvious. Yet, look who is teaching at Howard University.. I would hope the Board of Trustees is watching!

    Dimsdale in reply to dr. frank. | December 28, 2021 at 9:00 pm

    I am sure that the preeminent “historically black college/university” doesn’t mind one bit. Why do you think they offered her a doctoral (read it: unearned) appointment?

NHJ: Parents—shutup, shutup, shutup!
All your kids are belong to us!
You are on the way to destruction.
You have no chance to survive make your time.
Ha ha ha ha…

Parents: Move #FJB.
For great justice.

THIS tart is really this STUPID? I bet this has a phd?

Lybrarious Booker | December 28, 2021 at 1:02 pm

If there is any issue that can flip California red again, THIS is it.

Give us your children, and we will teach them fake history, and teach them to be racists, and encourage them to change their sex and to hate you.

In return, you only have to pay us $20,000 per year in taxes to indoctrinate your kids.

During World War I, French premier Georges Clemenceau said, “War is too important to be left to the generals.” Likewise, education is too important to be left to the educators.