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Duke University Researchers: Farmer’s Markets and Food Charity Belong to White Supremacy Culture

Duke University Researchers: Farmer’s Markets and Food Charity Belong to White Supremacy Culture

“Everyone in the United States is impacted by White Supremacy Culture”

The academic left’s obsession with race has become almost cartoonish. It’s like they can’t even hear themselves.

FOX News reports:

Duke University researchers say farmer’s markets, food charity part of ‘White supremacy culture’

A lecture series by Duke University researchers focuses on a racial framework to food issues, claiming elements such as food charity and farmer’s markets are part of “White supremacist” food culture.

The lecture, broadcast online as a webinar and provided at a Washington State University summit, places race as the most prominent factor in issues of food scarcity and how society attempts to resolve it. Jennifer Zuckerman and Alison Conrad, both White, of the Duke University World Food Policy Center claim that “Whiteness” has shaped every part of food culture, even labeling “good” and “bad” foods as an expression of racial power dynamics.

Unlike other areas of racial discourse such as workplace dynamics or education which derive mainly from social science, food and nutrition can derive from a more strictly scientific foundation. Zuckerman and Conrad’s research is entirely based on a cultural framework and does not touch on any potential scientific understanding or interpretation of nutrition that might help discuss the topic.

Some of the written material focuses on economic factors, such as land ownership and access to capital as limiting factors, but Zuckerman during the webinar mainly discussed economic impact by discussing how during philanthropic work she allocated funding to “best practice” methods such as “mobile produce markets,” which she said was a mistake. She did not touch on how a farmer’s market, for example, might provide access to foods to people of all backgrounds in a city where access or ability to grow food is limited or virtually non-existent.

Zuckerman defined “White Supremacy Culture” as the idea that White people and their ideas, thoughts, beliefs and actions are “inherently superior” to those of people of color. She insists that this has been “reproduced by all the institutions of our society.”

“Everyone in the United States is impacted by White Supremacy Culture,” Zuckerman stated during the webinar. She insisted that it is an “adaptive” framework, creating the potential to shift what the “culture” includes as time passes.

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Comments

The Friendly Grizzly | December 3, 2021 at 1:43 pm

Then, I have an idea. Food charity should be restricted to white people for white people by white people. May as well be what we’re accused of.

“Jennifer Zuckerman”: A dumb a** overcredentialed white chick with an identifiably Jewish last name who just happens to hold views that a Nazi could love.

    The Friendly Grizzly in reply to MarkJ. | December 3, 2021 at 2:36 pm

    I wonder if she has one of those awful accents, and also is ugly? Another question: why is it so many Jewish women come up with this nonsense? I thought we Jewish people were supposed to be intelligent. Oh that’s right, intelligence doesn’t mean smart.

Zuckerman defined “White Supremacy Culture” as the idea that White people and their ideas, thoughts, beliefs and actions are “inherently superior” to those of people of color. She insists that this has been “reproduced by all the institutions of our society.”

If it’s been reproduced by all the institutions of our society, maybe “White Supremacy Culture” really is superior.

So distributing food, always at a lower cost at farmer’s markets, to mutually benefit sellers and urban dwellers to provide fresh nutritious food is … white supremacy?

Several months ago, it was “white grocery chains aren’t serving black neighborhoods.” Now it’s “farmers markets and food charities are all white.”
Why is it our job?
Where are the black-owned groceries, farmers’ markets, and food charities?
Step up, brothers, and serve your communities.