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California Woman First to Face Federal Charges for Faking COVID Vaccination Cards

California Woman First to Face Federal Charges for Faking COVID Vaccination Cards

Juli A. Mazi is also accused of offering fake “homeoprophylaxis immunization”.

We predicted that it would be only a matter of time before someone produced fake COVID vaccine cards.

A California woman has become the first person in the country to face federal charges over coronavirus vaccine cards.

Juli A. Mazi, 41, of Napa was arrested Wednesday and charged with one count of wire fraud and one count of false statements related to health care matters, the Department of Justice said in a press release.

“This defendant allegedly defrauded and endangered the public by preying on fears and spreading misinformation about FDA-authorized vaccinations, while also peddling fake treatments that put people’s lives at risk. Even worse, the defendant allegedly created counterfeit COVID-19 vaccination cards and instructed her customers to falsely mark that they had received a vaccine, allowing them to circumvent efforts to contain the spread of the disease,” said Deputy Attorney General Lisa O. Monaco.

Given that this is California, Legal Insurrection readers will likely not be surprised that Mazi is a “naturopathic doctor.” She offered fake “homeoprophylaxis immunization,” so Mazi is also charged with offering counterfeit vaccines.

Federal officials say Mazi was selling “homeoprophylaxis immunization pellets,” which involve exposing someone who consumes them to a diluted amount of a disease in hopes of triggering an immune response. Prosecutors said she falsely claimed the pellets contained a minute amount of the COVID-19 virus and that the pellets would confer “lifelong immunity.” She also falsely told patients that the approved vaccines against COVID-19 contained “toxic ingredients.”

She also reportedly told patients that the treatment would be effective on children as well — even babies.

The homeoprophylaxis immunization treatment is not authorized by federal health officials to fight COVID-19. There is currently no approved vaccine for anyone under the age of 12.

Mazi should be worried about the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s involvement in the case. The agency is likely to take harsh measures for citizens challenging the federal government narrative on its key policies.

“Spreading inaccurate or false medical information about COVID-19 for personal gain, as the complaint alleges, is dangerous and only seeds skepticism among the public,” said Special Agent in Charge Craig D. Fair of the FBI’s San Francisco Field Office. “As the government continues to work to provide current and accurate information to help slow the spread of COVID-19, the FBI will continue to pursue those who attempt to fraudulently profit from spreading misinformation and providing false documentation.”

If convicted, Mazi faces a maximum 20 years in prison for the wire fraud charge and five years for the false statements charge. Each charge also carries a maximum $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release, although any sentence following conviction would take into consideration U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and the federal statute governing the imposition of a sentence.

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Comments


 
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Dathurtz | July 15, 2021 at 7:43 pm

Maybe I am just slow tonight (or every night). Exactly what is the charge for faking a covid vaccine charge? It looks like she was selling them as well as making false claims about a “medicine”.

Or am I just reading it wrongly?


 
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geronl | July 15, 2021 at 7:43 pm

When will Fauci be charged with making false statements on healthcare matters.


     
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    Milhouse in reply to geronl. | July 16, 2021 at 1:36 am

    Making false statements relating to health care matters is only a crime if it’s about “a matter involving a health care benefit program”. That means “any public or private plan or contract, affecting commerce, under which any medical benefit, item, or service is provided to any individual, and includes any individual or entity who is providing a medical benefit, item, or service for which payment may be made under the plan or contract.”

    So this woman must have been somehow involved in charging patients’ insurance for her snake-oil. Whereas Fauci’s false statements have no connection to any benefit plan, so he’s in the clear.


       
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      Idonttweet in reply to Milhouse. | July 16, 2021 at 10:45 pm

      Wouldn’t the prosecutors have to prove..actually prove..that her claims were materially false, and wouldn’t the defense have the opportunity to present evidence that the claims were in fact true? Interesting way to get potentially controversial information into the public record.


     
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    RAM500 in reply to geronl. | July 16, 2021 at 10:59 am

    Or for using our money to fund enemy development of bioweapons?


 
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henrybowman | July 15, 2021 at 8:21 pm

“Prosecutors said she falsely claimed the pellets contained a minute amount of the COVID-19 virus”

Falsely? That’s a harsh term. The pellets were simply asymptomatic.

“There is currently no approved vaccine for anyone under the age of 12.”

Technically, there is currently no approved vaccine for anyone of any age.

“the FBI will continue to pursue those who attempt to fraudulently profit from spreading misinformation and providing false documentation.”

Now do FISA warrants.


 
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nordic_prince | July 15, 2021 at 9:06 pm

“seeds skepticism among the public”

What REALLY “seeds skepticism among the public” is all the bull$#!+ spread by the likes of Fraud-chi and the CDC.


 
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Aarradin | July 16, 2021 at 2:21 am

Don’t worry though, using the Social Security number belonging to someone from Connecticut so you can pretend to be a citizen and run for President, that’s still legal.


     
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    Milhouse in reply to Aarradin. | July 16, 2021 at 7:38 am

    No, it isn’t, but there is not even a shred of evidence that 0bama did that. It’s a stupid story that stupid people tell each other, so they can deflect attention from all the actual reasons why he was the worst president since at least Wilson.

Why am I getting the sense that neither the FBI or the DOJ is as respected as it once was?


 
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2smartforlibs | July 16, 2021 at 8:56 am

Yet fake green cards SSI numbers birth cert and every other form on ID are fine as long as you cross that southern border first.


 
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RAM500 | July 16, 2021 at 10:57 am

But don’t even think of prosecuting those who lied under oath or filed false documents to frame Trump! Or illegal aliens who filed falsely to enter the US.


 
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agimarc | July 16, 2021 at 11:17 am

I can see jury nullification in our very near future. The feds can prosecute this all they want. When the juries refuse to convict, all that money is wasted.

Jury nullification was one of the things that helped kill Prohibition. The feds were no longer able to get convictions. They shouldn’t with this either. Cheers –


     
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    henrybowman in reply to agimarc. | July 16, 2021 at 4:09 pm

    Jury nullification is great in a country full of un-sheeple. We’re not there. We haven’t been since WWI. Prohibition didn’t lose to the un-sheeple, it lost to the self-interested.

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