Most Read
Image 01 Image 02 Image 03

DeSantis Signs Legislation Supporting Intellectual Diversity in Higher Ed With Consequences for ‘Indoctrination’

DeSantis Signs Legislation Supporting Intellectual Diversity in Higher Ed With Consequences for ‘Indoctrination’

“budget cuts could be looming if universities and colleges are found to be ‘indoctrinating’ students”

Florida’s Republican Governor Ron DeSantis signed a bill requiring public colleges and universities to survey students and faculty about their beliefs to combat indoctrination on campus.

Schools found indoctrinating students face funding consequences.

Ana Ceballos reports at the Tampa Bay Times:

State university faculty, students to be surveyed on beliefs

In his continued push against the “indoctrination” of students, Gov. Ron DeSantis on Tuesday signed legislation that will require public universities and colleges to survey students, faculty and staff about their beliefs and viewpoints to support “intellectual diversity.”

The survey will discern “the extent to which competing ideas and perspectives are presented” in public universities and colleges, and seeks to find whether students, faculty and staff “feel free to express beliefs and viewpoints on campus and in the classroom,” according to the bill.

The measure, which goes into effect July 1, does not specify what will be done with the survey results. But DeSantis and Sen. Ray Rodrigues, the sponsor of the bill, suggested on Tuesday that budget cuts could be looming if universities and colleges are found to be “indoctrinating” students.

“That’s not worth tax dollars and that’s not something that we’re going to be supporting moving forward,” DeSantis said at a press conference at a middle school in Fort Myers.

And that’s not all.

Bradford Betz of FOX News notes that the bill also allows students to record professors in class:

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signs bill permitting college students to record professors in class

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has signed into law a new bill that will, among other things, allow college students to use recordings of their college professors’ lectures as evidence in complaints about political bias to the university.

Per HB 233, students “may record video or audio of class lectures for their own personal educational use, in connection with a complaint to the public institution of higher education where the recording was made, or as evidence in, or in preparation for, a criminal or civil proceeding.”

Students, however, are still required to get permission from their professors to record the lecture.

As you can probably imagine, the left is losing its collective mind over this. Intellectual diversity is the only kind of diversity they don’t like.

The left has been allowed to operate free of any pushback for years, turning our college campuses into progressive indoctrination centers. Naturally, they’re outraged when someone finally tries to do something about it.

DONATE

Donations tax deductible
to the full extent allowed by law.

Comments

This particular law strikes me as being just theater. empty paperwork that will only be used to score political points on demand. I don’t see much chance of real enforcement.

Instead of threatening to cut funds unless some mythical target is met, just cut the funds. Make them WORK for their money and you’ll see some real changes in behavior!

    I agree. “Indoctrination” seems awfully vague, and I wouldn’t be surprised if the courts tore this to shreds.

    A better approach might be to go after community colleges and public universities that discriminate against conservatives, Jews, Christians, and males. Some professors and administrators seem to be in competition with each other over who can come up with the most vile and filthy remarks against these groups, and if that is not a “hostile learning environment” then nothing is.

This is not true: “Students, however, are still required to get permission from their professors to record the lecture.”

What the law says: “A recorded lecture may not be published without the consent of the lecturer.”

Ron DeSantis is a wonderful governor which will make Florida the state to watch in 2022 because if he could pull it off there it should inspire other governors (you know of actual red states especially) and will mean we aren’t totally marginal outside of the elite.

Mike LaChance: As you can probably imagine, the left is losing its collective mind over this.

So you’re okay with the government requiring that schools ask that faculty and students be asked to declare their political beliefs? And the lack of specifics on how this information will be used? (We also note the lack of dissent in the comment section.)

    Barry in reply to Zachriel. | June 25, 2021 at 12:21 pm

    “So you’re okay with the government requiring that schools ask that faculty and students be asked to declare their political beliefs?”

    That’s what you marxists have been doing for 50+ years, liar.

    hrhdhd in reply to Zachriel. | June 25, 2021 at 3:31 pm

    The survey doesn’t require the admission of political beliefs. Read the law.

      hrhdhd: Read the law.

      The State Board of Education shall select or create an objective, nonpartisan, and statistically valid survey to be used by each institution which considers the extent to which competing ideas and perspectives are presented and members of the college community, including students, faculty, and staff

      Which they define as “ideological and political perspectives”.

        hrhdhd in reply to Zachriel. | June 25, 2021 at 11:35 pm

        Wrong again.

        “The State Board of Education shall select or create an objective, nonpartisan, and statistically valid survey to be used by each institution which considers the extent to which competing ideas and perspectives are presented and members of the college community, including students, faculty, and staff, feel free to express their beliefs and viewpoints on campus and in the classroom.”

        A question about “the extent to which . . . members of the college community . . . feel free to express their beliefs” doesn’t require admission of any beliefs.

          hrhdhd: A question about “the extent to which . . . members of the college community . . . feel free to express their beliefs” doesn’t require admission of any beliefs.

          The State Board of Education shall require each Florida College System institution to conduct an annual assessment of the intellectual freedom and viewpoint diversity at that institution.

          How does a survey measure “viewpoint diversity” without asking about viewpoint?

          hrhdhd in reply to hrhdhd. | June 26, 2021 at 4:47 pm

          Didn’t read it, did you? The terms are defined in the law:

          (19) INTELLECTUAL FREEDOM AND VIEWPOINT DIVERSITY
          ASSESSMENT.—
          (a) For the purposes of this subsection, the term:
          1. “Intellectual freedom and viewpoint diversity” means the exposure of students, faculty, and staff to, and the encouragement of their exploration of, a variety of ideological and political perspectives.

          hrhdhd: The terms are defined in the law

          That’s right. The survey must assess viewpoint diversity. How do you think that will be done? Is creationism required for balance in biology class?

While this bill applies to colleges and universities, part of the teaching of CRT in public schools involves similar surveys and homework assignments

Are you okay with that?

    gitarcarver: While this bill applies to colleges and universities, part of the teaching of CRT in public schools involves similar surveys and homework assignments

    Whaddabout?!

    While this bill applies to colleges and universities, part of the teaching of {boogieman of the day} in public schools involves similar surveys and homework assignments

    If by critical race theory, you mean the study of how racism is built into the structure of institutions, that is rarely taught below the college level, and is certainly a valid field of study. Or did you mean anonymized surveys of students in public schools to determine whether they have experienced or witnessed bias in their daily lives? That is a far cry from the state asking students and teachers to declare their political beliefs, and then threatening to use the results to punish schools.

      Barry in reply to Zachriel. | June 25, 2021 at 12:20 pm

      Marxist liars are here again.

      1) CRT is more than just “how racism is built into the structure of institutions.” You know that and to argue differently is disingenuous.

      2) You admit that CRT is being taught in public schools. Where we disagree is to the extent of that teaching.

      3) Perhaps you missed that the homework and assignments are not anonymized, but have kids’ names on them.

      4) You are correct that making minors’ assignments on race, gender, etc is a far cry from what the Florida bill does. Whether you agree with it or not, the Florida Bill is allowed by law. The mandated homework and assignments dealing with aspects of CRT is contrary to federal law for minors.

      5) I am not happy with the bill. I also happen to think that if a recording of a teacher can be made without any disruption in the educational environment, students should be allowed to record the teacher / instructor / professor.

      In summary, the difference between you and I is that you are okay with CRT in lower level public schools, while I am against it. You are okay with schools and teachers breaking the law in those lower level schools, while I am against it.

      I suspect that we both agree that political beliefs should not be held against a teacher, but at the same time, I suspect that we disagree whether a student should be punished (by either threats of grades, banishment, etc.,) for respectfully disagreeing with that teacher when asked.

      Furthermore, you seem to believe in CRT which means that without any support or knowledge of individuals, you believe that everyone that is not of a certain race is a racist.

      In my county (which happens to be in Florida,) documents and videos of mandated teacher “training” included and focused on CRT have recently come to light. Teachers were told they could not opt out of the “training” and those that objected were deemed “insubordinate.” Therefore, answer this: if CRT is not in the public schools, why is it being mandated that teachers train on it and how to use components of CRT in the classroom?

      PS – my original question to you was not “whaddabout-ism” but rather a legitimate question on how you feel about CRT and such politicized questions in lower level schools. I was not willing to legitimize or agree with either. Me thinks thou doest protest too much.

        gitarcarver: 1) CRT is more than just “how racism is built into the structure of institutions.” You know that and to argue differently is disingenuous.

        Critical theory is an approach to social study that emphasizes that social problems are more a problem of social and cultural structures than by individual factors. Critical race theory applies this method to race relationships. It doesn’t take much reflection to understand systemic biases built into the system.

        gitarcarver: 2) You admit that CRT is being taught in public schools. Where we disagree is to the extent of that teaching.

        We said just the opposite: “If by critical race theory, you mean the study of how racism is built into the structure of institutions, that is rarely taught below the college level, and is certainly a valid field of study.” If you make up a definition, as the political right frequently does, then sure, the moon is made of taffy.

        gitarcarver: 3) Perhaps you missed that the homework and assignments are not anonymized, but have kids’ names on them.

        You didn’t provide any specifics.

        gitarcarver: 4) You are correct that making minors’ assignments on race, gender, etc is a far cry from what the Florida bill does. Whether you agree with it or not, the Florida Bill is allowed by law.

        There will almost certainly be constitutional challenges to at least some aspects of the law.

        gitarcarver: 5) I am not happy with the bill. I also happen to think that if a recording of a teacher can be made without any disruption in the educational environment, students should be allowed to record the teacher / instructor / professor.

        Then neither teachers or students will be able to talk freely. In addition, college lectures are considered the copyright of the professor, which is why the Florida law doesn’t allow publication of such recordings.

        gitarcarver: In summary, the difference between you and I is that you are okay with CRT in lower level public schools …

        For some weird “War on Christmas” definition of right-wing boogieman.

        gitarcarver: Furthermore, you seem to believe in CRT which means that without any support or knowledge of individuals, you believe that everyone that is not of a certain race is a racist.

        Which is exactly the opposite of critical race theory, other than the right-wing boogieman version, of course.

          Critical theory is an approach to social study that emphasizes that social problems are more a problem of social and cultural structures than by individual factors.

          So it is more than you initially stated. Thank you for proving my point.

          We said just the opposite:……that is rarely taught below the college level.”

          Once again, you admit that CRT is being taught at levels below college. If it is “rarely taught,” it is still is being taught. Thanks for proving my point.

          You didn’t provide any specifics.

          I didn’t realize that one needed to make the specific statement that homework assignments and in school assignments are done anonymously as you assert.

          There will almost certainly be constitutional challenges to at least some aspects of the law.

          Based on what? You seem to think that a Constitutional challenge means that the law is not legal. That’s laughable on its face.

          Then neither teachers or students will be able to talk freely.

          Which is what is happening now with teachers who don’t allow opinions other than theirs in the classroom.

          In addition, college lectures are considered the copyright of the professor, which is why the Florida law doesn’t allow publication of such recordings.

          This is debatable. For the lecture to be copyrighted, the lecture would have to be written down and not merely a discussion or an expansion of bullet points.”

          Secondly, as a public employee, Florida law allows the recording of public workers in the context of doing their job, especially in a public building.

          Third, arguably, the copyright challenge would most likely be thrown out due to fair use. The lecture’s economic value is not diminished. Furthermore, copyrighted materials can be used in limited cases such as for comments, public discussion, and for discussion on issues that affect the public.

          For some weird “War on Christmas” definition of right-wing boogieman.

          I apologize. While you wanted to say that people were wrong for not criticizing the new Florida law in colleges, you have not criticized the teaching of CRT in public schools. Forgive me for noting your hypocrisy.

          Which is exactly the opposite of critical race theory,

          You are not entitled to your own set of facts. Lectures on CRT have noted that non-whites cannot be racists, while whites are racists – even absent of any direct, individual proof. You appear to subscribe to that.

          In short, while calling out others for being a racist, you support racism.

          gitarcarver: So it is more than you initially stated.

          Z: the study of how racism is built into the structure of institutions

          Z: Critical theory is an approach to social study that emphasizes that social problems are more a problem of social and cultural structures than by individual factors.

          Not sure what point you are trying to make.

          gitarcarver: I didn’t realize that one needed to make the specific statement that homework assignments and in school assignments are done anonymously as you assert.

          You haven’t provided any examples of how “critical race theory” is part of anyone’s homework or assignments. Maybe check with the assignment on lunar taffy.

          gitarcarver: You seem to think that a Constitutional challenge means that the law is not legal.

          It would depend on the results of the court challenge, of course. But requiring a survey of students and teachers to profess their political positions would be to strike at free speech. The law doesn’t have any protections for the individual. If the survey were voluntary and anonymized, then it may not present a constitutional problem, but the law isn’t clear on that.

          gitarcarver: Which is what is happening now with teachers who don’t allow opinions other than theirs in the classroom.

          Specifics please. Can a student interrupt a biology lecture to proselytize about creationism?

          gitarcarver: For the lecture to be copyrighted, the lecture would have to be written down and not merely a discussion or an expansion of bullet points.”

          The lecturer or the institution owns the copyright, as long as it meets the other requirements of the law, such as originality.

          gitarcarver: Florida law allows the recording of public workers in the context of doing their job, especially in a public building.

          That doesn’t give them the right of publication, however, which is why the Florida law is structured as it is.

          gitarcarver: The lecture’s economic value is not diminished.

          Of course it is. Lecturers charge for their product. If someone takes it and posts it for free, then it reduces the value of the lecturer’s product.

          gitarcarver: Lectures on CRT have noted that non-whites cannot be racists, while whites are racists – even absent of any direct, individual proof.

          For certain wackadoodle definitions of critical race theory. Here’s an example of critical race theory:

          … I have been gravely disappointed with the white moderate. I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to “order” than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: “I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action”; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a “more convenient season.” Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will. Lukewarm acceptance is much more bewildering than outright rejection.

          Now, make a good faith effort to analyze the quote in light of critical theory.

          Not sure what point you are trying to make.

          The point is that CRT is more than just the theory that racism is institutional. You know that, but continue to rock the lie.

          You haven’t provided any examples of how “critical race theory” is part of anyone’s homework or assignments. Maybe check with the assignment on lunar taffy.

          Students have reported completing surveys on races, their race and being forced to acknowledge that they are racists. Perhaps you missed that.

          But requiring a survey of students and teachers to profess their political positions would be to strike at free speech.

          I just want to make sure that I am clear on your position…..asking requiring a survey is against Free Speech but a teacher requiring a student subscribe to CRT is not. You are clearly out in left field with argument as well as being hypocritical.

          Specifics please. Can a student interrupt a biology lecture to proselytize about creationism?

          Can a student argue that the teacher is wrong on their required adherence to CRT? You are aware that teachers and students have been let go, persecuted, had grades diminished for failing to subscribe to CRT. Teachers have told students they are not allowed to disagree on the subject. Of course, you aren’t concerned with that because it flies in the face of your fantasy world.

          The lecturer or the institution owns the copyright, as long as it meets the other requirements of the law, such as originality.

          Sorry, but no.

          That doesn’t give them the right of publication, however, which is why the Florida law is structured as it is.

          So you really think that publishing a video of a teacher for the purpose of comment and education is a violation of copyright law?

          That is absolutely ridiculous and you know it.

          Of course it is. Lecturers charge for their product. If someone takes it and posts it for free, then it reduces the value of the lecturer’s product.

          Professors are paid for teaching. If you have a problem with people knowing what is being said in the classroom, you have a problem with copyright law and with free speech.

          Once again, a professor’s / TA’s lecture is not diminished economically in the least.

          That doesn’t give them the right of publication, however, which is why the Florida law is structured as it is.

          Of course it does. Public employees acting their duties are part of the public record. That is the way it should be. Or are you in favor of officials acting behind closed doors?

          Now, make a good faith effort to analyze the quote in light of critical theory.

          Sure thing:

          “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

          CRT is against the beliefs and teachings of MLK Jr.

          Analyze that.

          You keep using a made up definition and fail to provide specifics.

          gitarcarver: Sure thing:

          You ignored the quote.

          You keep using a made up definition and fail to provide specifics.

          You keep relying on a definition that is incomplete. I have offered examples of how it is incomplete, but you ignore them.

          You ignored the quote.

          I did no such thing. I replied to your quote with another quote from MLK which shows the fallacy of CRT.

          The only person here that is ignoring anything, is you.

Font Resize
Contrast Mode
Send this to a friend