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Tom Cotton Introduces Bill to Prevent Spying by China on American College Campuses

Tom Cotton Introduces Bill to Prevent Spying by China on American College Campuses

“It is time we put an end to China’s abuse and ensure our intellectual property remains secured.”

This deserves widespread bipartisan support. We must get a handle on this issue.

Campus Reform reports:

Tom Cotton introduces ‘SECURE CAMPUS Act’ to stop Chinese spying at universities

Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) introduced a bill to stop the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) from conducting espionage on American college campuses.

According to a press release from his office, Sen. Cotton re-introduced the “SECURE CAMPUS Act” on April 22. The bill would “prohibit Chinese nationals from receiving visas to the United States for graduate or post-graduate studies in STEM fields and would ban participants in China’s foreign talent recruitment programs and Chinese nationals from taking part in federally-funded STEM research.”

Sen. Cotton remarked that “Allowing China unfettered access to American research institutions is akin to granting Soviet scientists access to our critical laboratories during the Cold War.”

“We shouldn’t allow the Chinese Communist Party to exploit the openness of American research institutions any longer,” he added in the press release. “The SECURE CAMPUS Act will help stop Chinese nationals from stealing U.S. technology, which the CCP uses against our own troops and businesses.”

“It is time we put an end to China’s abuse and ensure our intellectual property remains secured. I am proud to re-introduce this legislation with Senator Cotton,” said Rep. David Kustoff (R-TN), who introduced companion legislation in the House.

The bill text says that the Secretary of Homeland Security may not admit to the United States “an alien who is a citizen of the People’s Republic of China if the Secretary of State determines that the alien seeks to enter the United States to participate in graduate-level or post-graduate-level coursework or academic research in a field of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics at an institution of higher education.”

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Comments

henrybowman | May 23, 2021 at 3:38 pm

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if the Secretary of State determines that the alien seeks to enter the United States to participate in graduate-level or post-graduate-level coursework or academic research in a field of science, technology, engineering, or mathematics at an institution of higher education.

Of the nineteen 9/11 terrorists, 16 were granted tourist visas and three came over on business or student visas. Not a single one mentioned a desire to take flying lessons.

But sure, let’s pass a law to make espionage double-plus illegal.

The Friendly Grizzly | May 23, 2021 at 8:06 pm

Send all Chinese students – regardless of majjor – home. Send the Chinese instructors and” research” people right along with them.

Again, this is a math problem whereby China (along with all of Asia including India) have SO MANY people that they can send their best and brightest to the USA and the West in general (as foreign students, immigrants, agents and/or spies) and fill ALL of the prime educational, scholarship and job slots both here – and ALSO in their own countries.

This is the fundamental problem that the advanced math/tech high school in NOVA is experiencing. But the proposed solution is inadequate in that the recent past admissions system clearly favored Asians (remarkably including foreign citizen Asians) whereas the newly instituted admissions system clearly favors Hispanics and blacks (via targeted inclusion based on geography versus ability). Both admissions systems treat the needs and talents of gifted white USA citizen students (who are denied admissions) as irrelevant.

Let’s also address disallowing foreign nationals from participating in federally funded STEM research. Here’s a situation that I encountered: A full tenured (white) professor with a federal grant for STEM research used the federal funds in such a way as to subsidize multiple Chinese nationals who were allowed to ‘unofficially’ participate in the official STEM program. So, those Chinese nationals still were able to list the STEM research qualifications on their future graduate school and job applications.

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