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Brown U. Allowing Students to Report Sexual Harassment Anonymously Via New Online Form

Brown U. Allowing Students to Report Sexual Harassment Anonymously Via New Online Form

“adds an easily accessed and direct line of communication to the Title IX Office”

No one would ever abuse an anonymous service like this, would they? Also mentioned in the report, this service is also for reporting incidents of “gender harassment.” What could go wrong?

The Brown Daily Herald reports:

New online reporting form allows students to report sexual harassment anonymously

The Title IX Office introduced a new method of reporting incidents of sexual harassment, sexual violence or gender-based discrimination on its website Dec. 10, 2020. The online Sexual Violence and Gender-Harassment Incident Reporting Form aims to provide an easy mechanism to report incidents, Title IX Program Officer Rene Davis wrote in an email to The Herald.

The form “adds an easily accessed and direct line of communication to the Title IX Office,” Davis wrote.

The form allows students to report descriptions of incidents, concerns and involved persons, such as alleged aggressors, harmed individuals and witnesses, as well as the desired response from the Title IX Office. Students can also opt to make their reports anonymous.

The information submitted through the online form is only accessible to the staff in the Title IX Office, Davis wrote.

The idea for the form, which was designed by Davis, materialized following feedback generated from the 2019 Association of American Universities Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Misconduct. At the University, 31.2 percent of students surveyed had “little or no knowledge” about where to make a report of sexual violence or gender harassment whereas 30.4 percent were “very or extremely knowledgeable.”

The Sexual Violence and Gender-Harassment Incident Reporting Form is a new addition to the variety of resources available to students, and reporting mechanisms are also available through the Department of Public Safety and the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, according to Davis.

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Comments

So what happens if a student is complained about anonymously? Is he given a hearing and, unable to rebut such a vague charge, expelled?

Morning Sunshine | March 19, 2021 at 12:28 pm

what about my situation – the only time in my college career I was propositioned unwelcomingly was from another woman. Would my (anonymous) accusation be taken seriously, or would it have been seen as homophobic and thus a “gender harassment” episode?

I don’t see how they can provide an accused student of due process, if they don’t even know who the accuser is.

Anonymous sources have worked out great for the media. What could possibly go wrong here?

No one would ever abuse an anonymous service like this, would they?</i<

No one would ever DDoS this form with plausible but fictional accounts, rendering it useless, would they?

    Just remember that no matter the platform, there’s no such thing as anonymous. And laws on false reporting, like every other law in a Democrat domain, are enforced selectively.

“feedback generated from the 2019 Association of American Universities Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Misconduct… 31.2 percent of students surveyed had “little or no knowledge” about where to make a report of sexual violence or gender harassment”

Almost certainly the same people who graduate and then find themselves too stupid to figure out how to obtain a Voter ID.

Antifundamentalist | March 19, 2021 at 8:36 pm

Personally, I believe that actionable sexual harassment should be clearly defined (i.e. asking someone out once is not sexual harassment; but repeatedly asking after a clear and concise No, please don’t ask again, would be. Complimenting someone is not sexual harassment (you look nice today, that shirt looks nice on your), but a wolf whistle or “Nice @ss” would be, etc. And if you report sexual harassment, you need to have time,place, witnesses & be ready to talk to the police about it & sexual assault needs to be reported within 24 hours of either the incident or your escape from the perpetrator, or you can’t report it at all.

So basically all complaints against faculty or staff can be shut down at the get-go by the title IX political officer.

In fairness, the Title IX enforcement model is a legal one and “sex” takes its meaning from the statute. Title IX staff must now provide due process under the regulations adopted by the Trump Administration.

In contrast, gender bias allegations go to “incident response teams” who do not have legal training (certainly no understanding of freedom of speech) and operate on a model of preventing “hurt feelings” and promoting social justice.

We have less to fear from a Title IX Office than from the Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards, which promotes “restorative justice.”

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