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U. Iowa Student Charged With ‘Professional Misconduct’ for Challenging Criticism of Trump Order

U. Iowa Student Charged With ‘Professional Misconduct’ for Challenging Criticism of Trump Order

“It refused to let him bring an attorney or record the hearing, even though possible outcomes were probation or dismissal from the program.”

The school sent out an email criticizing Trump’s executive order on critical race theory. This student challenged it and faced punishment until Republican state Rep. Steven Holt took notice.

The College Fix reports:

University of Iowa charges student with ‘professional misconduct’ for challenging its criticism of Trump order

A taxpayer-funded university department has the right to its own views. But does it have the right to investigate students on trumped-up charges for disagreeing with those views?

The University of Iowa’s College of Dentistry charged a student with “professional misconduct” because he responded to its college-wide email condemning President Trump’s executive order on federally funded trainings in critical race theory, which may apply to some university activities.

It refused to let him bring an attorney or record the hearing, even though possible outcomes were probation or dismissal from the program.

Campus Reform reports that the college emailed the community Oct. 16 to state that, institutionally, “we stand unified against this order and its attack on people and free speech.”

Student Michael Brase hit “reply all” – as did several others – asking the College of Dentistry what it specifically objected to in the executive order…

The college felt differently. Associate Dean for Student Affairs Sherry Timmons (left) warned Brase in a Nov. 9 letter that his “unprofessional behavior” in response to the college-wide email meant he had to meet with the Collegiate Academic and Professional Performance Committee for a “Professional Misconduct Review Hearing” Nov. 23.

It specifically denounced his “follow-ups emails” that were sent after Brase was “offered other means to continue the conversation.” He would be asked to present “your views as to the reasons for your professional performance to date.”

Brase faced three options: “professional probation” under which he’d have to meet specific requirements; “dismissal” from the program, which would go to a higher level of review; and no action “at this time.”…

At that point he contacted several Republican state lawmakers, drawing interested responses from more than a dozen. The university apparently took the threat seriously with President Bruce Harreld and Dean David Johnsen quickly meeting with Rep. Steve Holt.

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Comments

Wake me when specific administration figures are forced to participate in a mandatory First Amendment sensitivity training program.

This may be actionable under section 1983.

    Milhouse in reply to RRRR. | December 17, 2020 at 4:34 pm

    Not any more, since they reversed themselves and apologized — though not to the victim. A mandatory sensitivity training program would be appropriate, and maybe the state legislature can require it, because the new DOE will certainly not.

I would show up with an attorney anyway and then dared them to deny each representation—with public witnesses.

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