The supposed bipartisanship to help the economic fallout from the Wuhan coronavirus fell apart on Sunday after Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi returned to DC.

Coincidence? Probably not because the minute she gets back, shows off her “wishlist,” the Democrats vote no on a bill they negotiated.

Six hours ago:

Then it fails to advance.

From The Daily Caller:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday said she will halt negotiations with the Senate and move to pass her own coronavirus package in the House, which could drag things out longer than many expected. Pelosi’s legislation will be a $1.6 trillion emergency package, according to Politico.

The text for a phase-three Senate bill announced Friday would give $1,200 checks to every person, while couples would receive $2,400. That $1,200 check will go to Americans making less than $75,000 annually. Each child will receive $500. The amount is reduced by $5 for every $100 a person earns over $75,000. Those making above $99,000 would not get any money.

The GOP’s bill also includes specific provisions for disabled veterans, low-income seniors, and individuals with no income tax liability with at least $2,500 in qualifying income, according to The Senate Finance Committee. There will also be a much smaller benefit of $600 for millions without federal tax liability.

A task force reportedly gave the idea to Republicans during their caucus lunch. Republican South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham reportedly opposes direct payments. However, Graham said he is “willing to pay 75 percent of people’s income up to $80,000 to get us through,” adding, “this ought to be enough money to get us through the next six to eight weeks.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unloaded on Pelosi after the vote:

Others noted on Twitter that they can see right through Pelosi’s games, but know that the MSM will spin it to blame the Republicans.

BACKGROUND — Democrats’ Plan: “This is a tremendous opportunity to restructure things to fit our vision”

The Hill:

On a Thursday conference call featuring more than 200 members of the House Democratic caucus, lawmakers one by one laid out a sweeping wish list of provisions they want to see included in the nascent package, including a boost in infrastructure spending, an expansion of Social Security benefits and funding for states to set up an all-mail voting system in the event the pandemic extends into November’s elections.

“This is a tremendous opportunity to restructure things to fit our vision,” Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) told lawmakers, according to a source on the call.

 

 
donate
Donations tax deductible
to the full extent allowed by law.