Due to a glitch in a recent Facebook update, teen green activist Greta Thunberg is now addressing supporters have who have raised questions over who writes her climate change posts.

The Swedish teenager has amassed a loyal band of supporters on social media where she shares regular updates on her efforts to raise awareness of the threats facing the environment. But a Facebook bug which was live for several hours from Thursday evening to Friday morning enabled users to see which admins were responsible for editing pages. This meant that any user could view anonymous accounts which edit pages, including those belonging to celebrities.

One quick-minded fan of Greta, 17, tapped into one of her posts thanks to the glitch and managed to take screenshots of the accounts which had edited it.

And to her followers’ dismay, it showed the the accounts behind some of the posts were those belonging to her father Svante Thunberg and Indian climate change activist Adarsh Prathap.

Compare and contrast:

The teen activist quickly responded on Facebook:

And while it is hard to know who is typing the Tweets, it is interesting that Thunberg has now decided to target tennis legend Roger Federer over his association with financial institution Credit Suisse.

The 20-time Grand Slam winner came under fire from the climate activist when she criticized the Swiss bank for its record of loans to fossil fuel industries.

The 38-year-old Federer, who is currently in bushfire-ravaged Australia preparing for the first major of the year, said Sunday he is “happy to be reminded” of his responsibilities, but stopped short of abandoning his sponsorship deal with the bank.

Federer was urged to “wake up” in a retweet by Thunberg last week, which also prompted the hashtag #RogerWakeUpNow to trend on Twitter.

Federer responded with a great deal of restraint and circumspection.

However, he refused to address his relationship with the bank directly.

One wonders how much Thunberg cares, or if this was a tennis ball lobbed for a media distraction from troubling questions about the realities of using a struggling teen as a climate change shield.

 

 
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