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Poll Finds 88% of College Students Say it’s not Offensive to Wish Strangers a Merry Christmas

Poll Finds 88% of College Students Say it’s not Offensive to Wish Strangers a Merry Christmas

“the results might be surprising given the chokehold political correctness has on college campuses today”

This is a bit of good news for the holiday. Merry Christmas!

The College Fix reports:

POLL: 88% of college students say it’s NOT offensive to wish ‘Merry Christmas’ to a stranger

It appears the political correctness grinch hasn’t entirely stolen away the Christmas joy on campuses.

The vast majority of students recently surveyed said it is not offensive to wish “Merry Christmas” to a stranger, according to a College Fix poll.

The online poll asked roughly 1,000 college students: “Is it offensive to wish ‘Merry Christmas’ to a stranger?” Eighty-eight percent responded it is not. Another 8 percent said they were not sure. And finally 4 percent said yes, it is offensive.

While the results might be surprising given the chokehold political correctness has on college campuses today, they ring similar to a national poll taken in 2016 of 1,224 registered voters that found only 3 percent of respondents were personally offended by “Merry Christmas.”

The student poll was conducted last week exclusively for The College Fix by College Pulse, an online survey and analytics company focused on college students.

The Fix poll questioned roughly 1,000 students — 294 Democrat students, 531 independents and 171 college Republicans. Eight percent of Democrat students said it’s offensive to wish someone a Merry Christmas, 3 percent of independent students said it was, and only 1 percent of Republican students found it offensive.

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Comments

Yes, it’s good news. The bad news is that someone thought it necessary to ask.

I wish people a Merry Christmas as I am Catholic. My good friends that are Jewish wish me a Happy Chanukah. I tell them thank you. What we are both saying is that we are wishing the other well. Being wished well by someone via their religious beliefs is a good thing. Good things should be celebrated.

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