Jeffrey Epstein was accused of being a serial sexual predator who ran a rape ring that included some of the world’s richest and most powerful men and victimized underaged girls.

Everything about Epstein’s supposed suicide stinks to high heaven. From the time he was mysteriously and inexplicably left alone, to the autopsy report.

According to the New York Times, “roughly 15 employees at the Metropolitan Correctional Center where Jeffrey Epstein killed himself in his jail cell have been subpoenaed as the criminal investigation into the events around his suicide intensifies.”

The warden and the head of the federal Bureau of Prisons have been reassigned. Two employees accused of sleeping on the job and falsifying records have been placed on administrative leave.

Now, roughly 15 employees at the Metropolitan Correctional Center where Jeffrey Epstein killed himself in his jail cell have been subpoenaed as the criminal investigation into the events around his suicide intensifies, according to a prison official and a person with knowledge of the matter.

The subpoenas, issued in recent days by federal prosecutors in Manhattan, are the latest sign of the heightened scrutiny over the suicide of the high-profile detainee at the chronically understaffed federal jail.

The United States attorney general, William P. Barr, whose Justice Department oversees the Bureau of Prisons, has complained about “serious irregularities at this facility.” On Wednesday he went further, telling reporters in Dallas, “unfortunately, there have been some delays because a number of the witnesses were not cooperative.”

It was unclear which employees had received subpoenas, but Mr. Barr said on Wednesday that a number of witnesses at the jail were requiring union representation and lawyers before they would agree to interviews.

Eric Young, the president of the union that represents federal prison workers, disputed Mr. Barr’s claim that jail employees had been uncooperative. He said the Justice Department had been unwilling to grant immunity to workers.

See our previous coverage of the saga Epstein here.

 
 
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