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Michigan State University Students Protest Flat Rate Tuition

Michigan State University Students Protest Flat Rate Tuition

“The group wants the university to lower that number to 12 because some students cannot afford to pay for 15 credits.”

https://www.wlns.com/news/local-news/msu-students-protest-universitys-flat-rate-tuition/

Apparently, Michigan State University’s flat-rate tuition is not low enough. Students want it lowered to 12 credits because some cannot afford 15 credits. From WLNS.com:

Wednesday was the first day of classes at Michigan State University and instead of wearing green and white, some students traded in their school colors for all black in protest.

The students are protesting MSU’s new flat-rate tuition. It just took effect for students enrolled in this 2019 fall semester, but the MSU Black Student Alliance is already noticing negative impacts because of this flat rate.

“I know a couple of students, more than a couple, that didn’t come back just because at this flat rate tuition they can’t afford MSU anymore,” MSU Black Student Alliance President Sharron Reed-Davis said.

MSUBSA is the group responsible for putting this protest together. They said students can take 12 to 18 credits for a flat rate and then students will only have to pay for 15. The group wants the university to lower that number to 12 because some students cannot afford to pay for 15 credits.

Reed-Davis said at MSU, “The black student retention rate is very low here, like they pride themselves on diversity and inclusion, but they don’t pride themselves on keeping us here and seeing us graduate cause the amount of black students that come into Michigan State is not the amount of black students that leave.”

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Comments

ScottTheEngineer | August 29, 2019 at 10:12 am

If you can afford cash it’s not a problem. If not your on a student loan and it’s not a problem.
You should be only paying for what you use though.

The bigger issue is the drop out rate after the student loan refund checks get cut.

Can’t they still pay by the credit? Or are they only allowed to take *less* than 12 (less than fulltime) then? Still it doesn’t seem that much of an issue, take 10 or 11 credits instead of 12, no reason to leave the university altogether.

amatuerwrangler | August 29, 2019 at 10:23 am

Its just registration. Its the best excuse for a protest they could come up with this early in the school year. They will find some super-bad (“really good”, in English) reason once they get organized.

East Lansing is ripe for a Gibsons franchise.

Maybe the way to fix the destructive effects of universities negative effects is to end student loans.

In the mean time, the first advertisement in this story on my feed was for Oberlin college. The ad says “185 years. And still passionately idealistic. Oberlin. A history of looking forward.”

2nd Ammendment Mother | August 29, 2019 at 11:05 am

When did 12 hours become full time? When I was in college (BS and Masters) full time was 18 to 21 hours. I definitely know our classes were much tougher than today.

    Full time is typically 12 to 17/18/19 hours.

    This is not hours of the week though as some classes are only 1 credit but meet for several hours a week (labs, for example).

      healthguyfsu in reply to healthguyfsu. | August 29, 2019 at 2:41 pm

      Also, while 12 hours is full time, you need to average at least 15 credits at most schools to finish in 4 years (or take 1-2 summer classes with 12-14 hours per semester).

I figure that I spent at least 1 year of college time typing papers with two fingers and using white out. So how college takes more than 3 years with a laptop or word processor available is just beyond me.

cause the amount of black students that come into Michigan State is not the amount of black students that leave

Based on the tortured grammar in this sentence, I think I may have divined the root of the problem.

The ongoing problem is COST. Since the 90’s the cost (adjusted for inflation) has increased by 250-400%.

The admin side’s inflation of bureaucrats is the problem. There are fewer tenured profs now, more adjunct.

Lower COSTS and this problem will mostly go away.

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